DoctorsHealthPress.com Lends Support to Study Showing Accelerated Cancer Growth Attributed to Stress

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The Doctors Health Press, a publisher of various natural health newsletters, books and reports, including the popular online Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin, is lending its support to a recent study showing that cancer can be accelerated by a body prone to worrying and anxiety.

doctorshealthpress.com lends support to study showing accelerated cancer growth attributed to stress

DoctorsHealthPress.com Lends Support to Study Showing Accelerated Cancer Growth Attributed to Stress

Consistent anxiety also came hand-in-hand with chronic stress and a dampened immune system. Though stress is well-documented to cause disease, this is the first study to connect the personality trait of high anxiety to greater cancer threats.

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The Doctors Health Press, a publisher of various natural health newsletters, books and reports, including the popular online Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin, is lending its support to a recent study showing that cancer can be accelerated by a body prone to worrying and anxiety.

As reported in Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin on Thursday, May 3, 2012 (http://www.doctorshealthpress.com/cancer-articles/calming-advice-for-cancer-patients), Stanford University researchers discovered, in mice, that anxiety led to more severe cancer than in those that remained calm.

The Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin article reports that in the study, hairless mice were dosed with ultraviolet (UV) rays and the nervous ones developed more tumors and more invasive cancer. Consistent anxiety also came hand-in-hand with chronic stress and a dampened immune system. Though stress is well-documented to cause disease, this is the first study to connect the personality trait of high anxiety to greater cancer threats.

While some stress can actually be good for the body, it’s the chronic kind that exerts a negative toll on the body. It makes you less able to fend off disease. To find out how much stress is too much, this study sought to figure out the link between anxiety and actual stress.

The Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin article also reports that they did special evaluations to see which mice exhibited characteristics that resembled high anxiety. Then they administered UV rays similar to those people would experience if they spent too much time in the sun. A few months later, tumors developed. The types of tumors, though, would be very susceptible to an immune system attack.

All mice did develop skin cancer, but the anxious ones had more tumors and were the only ones to have invasive forms of cancer. Nervous mice had higher levels of cells that suppressed the immune system, and had fewer chemical signals that fired up an immune protective response.

The last piece of the puzzle: levels of corticosterone, which comes out in response to disease and stress, were cranked up in anxious mice. Therefore, they had more sensitive stress sensors and a lower threshold for dealing with stressful situations.

(SOURCE: "Anxiety increases cancer severity in mice, Stanford study shows," Stanford University Medical Center, Apr. 24, 2012.)

Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin is a daily e-letter providing natural health news with a focus on natural healing through foods, herbs and other breakthrough health alternative treatments. For more information on Doctors Health Press, visit http://www.doctorshealthpress.com.

The Doctors Health Press believes in the healing properties of various superfoods, like pistachios, as well as the benefits of taking vitamins and supplements, Chinese herbal remedies and homeopathy. To see a video outlining the Doctors Health Press' views on homeopathic healing, visit http://www.doctorshealthpress.com/homeopathy.

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