Biological Explanation of God Ends Historic Divide Between Science & Religion

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The World Transformation Movement presents an article by Australian Biologist Jeremy Griffith where he draws on his ground breaking biological synthesis of the human condition to unlock the impasse that has historically divided science and religion.

“The agony of our human condition, of not knowing if we are good or bad, is the underlying core issue of all human affairs, and the conundrum that both science and religion have desperately sought to address,” says Griffith.

Australian biologist Jeremy Griffith has targeted the most profound of questions in his new paper, ‘Is there a God?’.

The paper (http://www.worldtransformation.com/is-there-a-god) explains the existence of God as a natural, universal, integrative force, rather than an ethereal super-natural deity.

Griffith draws on his ground breaking biological synthesis of the human condition to unlock the impasse that has historically divided science and religion.

“The agony of our human condition, of not knowing if we are good or bad, is the underlying core issue of all human affairs, and the conundrum that both science and religion have desperately sought to address,” says Griffith.

Griffith cites the works of renowned physicists Albert Einstein and Stephen Hawking to explain that God is the personification of the ordering, selfless, integrative, cooperative and loving meaning of existence.

His paper quotes Hawking: ‘The overwhelming impression is of order. The more we discover about the universe, the more we find that it is governed by rational laws. If one liked, one could say that this order was the work of God. Einstein thought so…We could call order by the name of God.’1 ‘I would use the term God as the embodiment of the laws of physics.’2

Griffith says that because the negative characteristics of human behaviour, of being angry, egocentric and competitive, have appeared ‘unGodly’, humanity has historically only been able to cope by viewing God as an abstract, omnipotent being, or in the case of traditional science, by maintaining that God doesn’t exist.

“Admitting and accepting the truth of the integrative, cooperative, unconditionally selfless, loving meaning of existence left humans feeling unbearably condemned as bad, evil or unworthy for our divisive competitive, selfish and aggressive, seemingly-unloving behaviour.

“Only when we could explain the good reason why we humans have not been ideally behaved—explain the human condition no less, which fortunately we now can—would it be psychologically safe to confront, admit and accept that the meaning of life is to be integrative, cooperative, selfless and loving.”

Griffith, who is among a handful of scientists dedicated to bringing holistic explanation to our paradoxical human behaviour, explains the rift between science and religion existed because scientists have traditionally taken a reductionist, mechanistic approach to understanding the workings of our world.

“Yesterday’s scientists have avoided the truth of integrative meaning and God by arguing that there is no direction or meaning to existence and that change is random,” says Griffith.

“They also claimed that religion and science were two totally unrelated realms—to the point that a leading scientist, Harvard University’s E.O. Wilson, has said, ‘I take a very strong stance against the mingling of religion and science.’”

In support of his thesis, Griffith also cites the work of Nobel Prize-winning physicist Charles H. Townes: ‘they [religion and science] both represent man’s efforts to understand his universe and must ultimately be dealing with the same substance. As we understand more in each realm, the two must grow together…converge they must.’

‘Is there a God?’ points out that, ironically, mechanistic science had to first establish how genes and nerves function before the human condition could be explained, thereby unlocking all manner of mystery about human life, including being able to demystify God and to finally bring science and religion together.

‘Is there a God?’ is one of several short articles developed by Griffith to help demonstrate the universal application of his synthesis to subjects wide and varied. These articles, on topics including ‘What is the meaning of life’ (http://www.worldtransformation.com/what-is-the-meaning-of-life), ‘Our ego and Egocentric lives’ (http://www.worldtransformation.com/ego) and ‘How can we save the world?’ (http://www.worldtransformation.com/save-the-world), appear in Griffith’s latest publication, The Book of Real Answers to Everything! (The book is freely available online at http://www.worldtransformation.com)

Griffith’s biological treatises on God and the human condition, previously published in titles including the Australian bestseller A Species in Denial (2003) and Freedom (2009), have received recognition from scientific peers and independent thinkers worldwide.

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Tony Gowing