A Practical Guide for Product Companies Buying Requirements Management

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Accept Software releases a practical e-buyer’s guide to requirements management solutions for companies who want to quickly get past the “me too” sales pitches of dozens of providers and learn to arm themselves with no-nonsense buying criteria. This practical 6-page e-buyer’s guide provides a solid, working view of what types of requirement’s management tools are out there and what they can and cannot ‘really’ do.

“By and large much of the product industry still begins and ends with requirements management tools to get their products built, and for many businesses that’s like using a piece of paper to design a skyscraper.” Nils Davis, Accept Software

Accept Software releases an e-buyer’s guide covering the key criteria companies need to consider before shopping for a new requirements management solution starting with the realities and nature of their business.

The first requirements management applications were developed in the 60’s and 70’s to address tens of thousands of requirements provided by the US Federal Government to contractors like Boeing or McDonnell Douglass (who in turn shared them with their contractor), for a product like a jet or tank. In these situations, the primary need was validating that every single requirement had been designed, implemented, and tested. The underlying assumption was that the requirements were right and correct and all the contracting organization needed to do was demonstrate when, where, and by whom they had been fulfilled.

Things have certainly changed. In today’s business, determining exactly “what to build” can involve dozens of people and take many months of analysis and planning. Yet many product organizations are attempting to apply solutions developed decades ago to try and solve modern product planning problems.

It’s important to understand that many vendors have attempted to remarket project-oriented solutions for product organizations. Most requirements management tools are not able to handle the capabilities needed for modern day product planning. They are especially ill-equipped at enabling collaboration and prioritization – two key capabilities for aligning markets to business goals and objectives.

“By and large much of the product industry still begins and ends with requirements management tools to get their products built, and for many businesses that’s like using a piece of paper to design a skyscraper.”

  •     Nils Davis, Director Product Management, Accept Software

The e-buyer’s guide is not exhaustive, but rather gives a practical, quick view into the key considerations companies’ project - product owners need to make when buying a solution that will fit their needs. It recommends solutions based on both the characteristics of a company and their project or product-line objectives.

About: When companies outstrip their “business-as-usual” product planning tools and in-house solutions Accept Software’s product planning empowers global enterprises to accommodate constant change, coordinate teams and manage product scope, no matter how large or complex, from concept to delivery.

Accept Software’s collaborative approach gives companies, with complex product planning challenges, a modern solution for aligning their products to the best market opportunities.
Download The Practical e-Buyer’s Guide to Requirements Management. Also consider downloading The Case for Modernizing Product Planning, or visit http://www.accept360.com or call +1.866.423.8376.

Copyright © 2003-2012 Accept Software. Accept360. All rights reserved.

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Jon Gettinger
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