How To Keep Bees Away From Hummingbird Feeders—Tips From Duncraft

Each spring when hummingbird feeders go up, Duncraft begins to get calls from customers asking how to keep bees away from the sweet nectar. If bees or wasps are a problem, Duncraft offers these tips:

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Aspects HummZinger Ultra

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Thank you for these tips, I'm definitely going to try them!...Allison, comment on Duncraft's Wild Bird Blog

Concord, NH (PRWEB) May 15, 2012

Each spring when hummingbird feeders go up, Duncraft begins to get calls from customers asking how to keep bees away from the sweet nectar. If bees or wasps are a problem, Duncraft offers these tips:

Use a hummingbird feeder with bee guards or bee guard tips so the bees can’t get into the nectar.

Try feeders that have no yellow in them. The color yellow could be attractive to bees. Duncraft has a huge selection of hummingbird feeders, many that do not have any yellow color on them.

If the “bees” are actually yellow jackets, a kind of wasp, you may be able to reduce the population with yellow jacket traps.

Move your hummingbird feeder to a very shady location. Bees prefer to eat in sunny areas. Distract bees with a saucer of nectar where the feeder used to be.

Make the nectar less sweet. Try 5 parts of water to 1 part sugar instead of the usual 4 parts water to one part sugar.

Spraying a very light coating of cooking oil on the feeder may stop bees from landing on it. But use caution not to overdo it. Oil on hummingbird feathers can be harmful to them.

A very small amount of petroleum jelly on the feeder flowers might also help stop bees from landing. Be sure to wipe off the excess so hummingbirds don’t get it on their feathers.

After hanging with fresh nectar, be sure to clean off sugary drips or spills on the outside of the feeder so bees won’t be attracted to the sugary scent.

Never use insect-killing chemicals around hummingbird feeders! It’s bad for the hummingbirds and may also kill beneficial honey bees!

Founded in 1952 and located in Concord, New Hampshire, Duncraft’s objective is to bring the joy of backyard birding to wild bird lovers all across the country. Mike Dunn, owner and CEO is constantly inventing and searching for innovative ideas in bird feeding—giving bird lovers years of bird feeding enjoyment, success and satisfaction.

Duncraft
102 Fisherville Road
Concord, NH 03303
603-224-0200


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