Anyone Can Prove Reincarnation: Filmmaker and Author Demonstrates with His Own Case

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Stephen Sakellarios, producer of the independent film "In Another Life: Reincarnation in America," is releasing two new books detailing how he claims to have proven that he is the reincarnation of Matthew Franklin Whittier, younger brother of poet John Greenleaf Whittier; and how he reconnected with his first wife from that 19th century life, Abby Poyen Whittier, who is still in the astral realm after dying in 1841. The first book demonstrates how anyone, using the same readily-available methods, can prove a recent past life; and the second shows grieving soul mates how they can reconnect with their partners and re-establish an amazingly complete relationship.

Stephen Sakellarios, producer of the independent film "In Another Life: Reincarnation in America," is releasing two new books detailing how he claims to have proven that he is the reincarnation of Matthew Franklin Whittier, younger brother of poet John Greenleaf Whittier; and how he reconnected with his first wife from that 19th century life, Abby Poyen Whittier, who is still in the astral realm after dying in 1841. The first book demonstrates how anyone, using the same readily-available methods, can prove a recent past life; and the second shows grieving soul mates how they can reconnect with their partners and re-establish an amazingly complete relationship.

When it comes to proving the existence of reincarnation, there are two distinct camps. On one side, you have the people who can show you a face similar to that of a historical person, plus a string of coincidences like having the same birth date, and pronounce the case solved. On the other side are researchers who, implementing strict investigative techniques, claim that proving reincarnation requires a child, who has not been exposed to books and popular media, remembering a stunning list of specific, verifiable details.

Stephen Sakellarios, producer of the 2003 reincarnation documentary, "In Another Life: Reincarnation in America," believes there is another way. He is convinced that by comparing "emotional past-life memory," which nearly everyone possesses, and "past-life image recognition memory" to the historical record as it can now be accessed on the internet, anyone can prove their own case. Sakellarios comments, "I had been promoting other people's reincarnation proof cases for years, and decided to see whether I could uncover my own. Turns out I could, and because I used methods open to anyone, I believe that anyone could do this." He added, "Of course, in order for it to stand as proof, they would have to work as hard as I did to pursue the clues with strict honesty and carefully document them."

In his recently-released e-book, "Matthew Franklin Whittier in his own words," Sakellarios claims to have done just that. Having first announced a possible past-life match in 2005, he researched the case for six years--most intensively from 2009 to 2011--and he now considers it solved. He says, "There were many times early in the research when I simply wouldn't recognize something I should have been familiar with, if I was really Matthew's reincarnation, and I'd question the whole thing. But gradually, I began to understand how past-life emotional memory works. If it wasn't important to you, or, if it was very important to you but you blocked it, it won't seem familiar. It's like having almost total amnesia, with just the feelings coming through plus a few shreds of memories attached to them. But if you're persistent, you can learn to work with this method and get leads through it. And if you document very carefully which came first--the feeling-memories or the recorded history--you can prove a case with it."

"Matthew Franklin Whittier in his own words" also contains 27 examples of Whittier's own work. The younger brother of Romantic poet John Greenleaf Whittier, Matthew Whittier wrote humorous sketches which appeared to be letters to the editor from a character named "Ethan Spike." Ethan Spike, a Maine "backwoodsman," was similar to the "All in the Family" character, "Archie Bunker." The letters were written in dialect, Whittier being only the second humorist to write in this style, after Seba Smith who created the "Jack Downing" character in 1830. B.P. Shillaber, editor of "The Carpet Bag," who first published Mark Twain, said of Matthew's character, "But, speaking of 'Ethan Spike,' he was a genius. Not in the same line as that of his illustrious brother, John G. Whittier, but in his own he was certainly out of the ordinary. He was a genuine humorist, and he founded a school of comic literature which brought out many imitators. In short, he was original, unique and of a high grade in his peculiar field." This is the first time that a body of Matthew Whittier's work will appear in print. Says Sakellarios, "I may not remember holding the pen, sitting at the desk or what the room looked like, but I do remember how his mind worked, what he was intending to accomplish, and which passages he was particularly pleased with. And my mind works the same, today."

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