Liberty Bell Award Presented to 3L Travis Moore for Exemplary Volunteer Efforts

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The Chicago Bar Association honored John Marshall Law School student Travis Moore with its Liberty Bell Award for his volunteer efforts on behalf of homeowners facing foreclosure.

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Mediation is the first point of contact with an attorney for these homeowners. For some, it’s a dignified exit case, but for others you can do loan modifications. I was working with troubled clients who needed help.

The Chicago Bar Association honored John Marshall Law School student Travis Moore with its Liberty Bell Award for his volunteer efforts on behalf of homeowners facing foreclosure.

The honor was presented to him for his more than 250 hours committed to Chicago Volunteer Legal Services (CVLS) projects this past year. The presentation was made on April 30, 2012.

Moore, who will be a 3L student in the fall, says his volunteer efforts have helped him recognize the value of legal representation in navigating the numerous housing-related issues people face today. Moore gives his time because, he says, many people feel lost in the legal system and organizations that are offering assistance are severely understaffed. His volunteer efforts have given him an insider’s view of the work public assistance attorneys do.

“I just knew I wanted to focus on work experience,” Moore says of his incredible record of service. “I made my school schedule as conducive as possible.”

He began volunteering in summer 2011 for the Chicago Volunteer Legal Services call center, and for the Lawyers Committee for Better Housing. He also volunteered his first year of law school for Cabrini Green Legal Aid working on criminal record expungements.

In the spring 2012 semester, Moore was at the Cook County Mortgage Foreclosure Mediation Program, and assisted the Access for Justice Program Mondays and Fridays, helping homeowners understand the process available to them.

“Mediation is the first point of contact with an attorney for these homeowners,” he explains. “For some, it’s a dignified exit case, but for others you can do loan modifications. I was working with troubled clients who needed help.”

When the case proceeded to litigation, Moore was part of the process working on responsive pleadings or motion drafting.

During summer break, Moore is working at Cabrini Green Legal Aid helping residents who have issues relating to U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Section 8 vouchers.

In the fall 2012 semester, Moore is enrolled as a student at the Fair Housing Legal Clinic and he again will volunteer with Chicago Volunteer Legal Services. He now has a 711 license which enables him to be more directly involved in cases.

A native of Kansas City, Kansas, Moore came to the Chicago area to attend North Park University, earning a bachelor’s degree in philosophy and a certificate in non-profit business operations. He worked for a short time before deciding on a career in law.

“In the civil rights era, housing was a major issue. Then it was moved to the back burner, and now it’s back in the spotlight because of class distinctions and the mortgage foreclosure issues,” Moore explained. “I know having a law degree will empower me to truly make a difference in peoples’ lives.”

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Marilyn Thomas
John Marshall Law School
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