DoctorsHealthPress.com Supports Study that there is a Metaphoric Link between Meat and Men

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The Doctors Health Press, a publisher of various natural health newsletters, books and reports, including the popular online Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin, is supporting a study that examines the link between men and meat, and how it could be impacting nutritional health.

DoctorsHealthPress.com Supports Study that there is a Metaphoric Link between Meat and Men

DoctorsHealthPress.com Supports Study that there is a Metaphoric Link between Meat and Men

The Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin article reports that in many experiments that looked at metaphors and certain foods, like meat and milk, the study found that people rated meat as more masculine than vegetables.

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The Doctors Health Press, a publisher of various natural health newsletters, books and reports, including the popular online Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin, is supporting a study that examines the link between men and meat, and how it could be impacting nutritional health.

As reported in Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin on Wednesday, May 30, 2012 (http://www.doctorshealthpress.com/men%E2%80%99s-health/is-masculinity-affecting-mens-health), a new study has found that men are reluctant to try vegetarian products. It found that consumers are influenced by a strong association of meat with masculinity. In many experiments researchers examined the possibility that there is a metaphoric link between meat and men. Such a conception is not difficult to imagine. The answer they found was a strong connection between eating meat—particularly muscle meat, like steak—and masculinity.

The Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin article reports that in many experiments that looked at metaphors and certain foods, like meat and milk, the study found that people rated meat as more masculine than vegetables. They also found that meat generated more masculine words when people discussed it, and that people viewed male meat eaters as being more masculine than non-meat eaters.

According to Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin, the conception is that the strong, traditional, macho, bicep-flexing, All-American male requires red meat to be strong and macho. Meat is an All-American food, not vegetables. And certainly not soy, which is produced and made into alternative meat choices that are packed with nutrients and certifiably healthier to eat than a flank steak. But nutrition takes a back seat to image, because for a man to eat tofu sausages, he would have to give up a food perceived as strong and powerful like himself. In its place he would be eating a food that is considered weak and unmanly.

The Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin article also reports that, if marketers of health advocates want to counteract such powerful associations, they need to address the metaphors that shape consumer attitudes, according to the study. If an educational campaign ran that urges people to eat more soy or vegetables, it would have a tough time convincing the public. But reshaping soy burgers to make them resemble beef or giving them grill marks might help cautious men make the transition.

According to Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin, most of the Western world eats too much meat. Soy aside, it often comes at the expense of vegetables. If we are talking about image, there probably aren’t too many vegetables that would fall into the “manly” category. Men would be wise to ignore such food stereotypes; instead doing what is needed for health.

(SOURCE: Rozin, P., et al., "Is Meat Male? A Quantitative Multi-Method Framework to Establish Metaphoric Relationships," Journal of Consumer Research, published online May 16, 2012.)

Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin is a daily e-letter providing natural health news with a focus on natural healing through foods, herbs and other breakthrough health alternative treatments. For more information on Doctors Health Press, visit http://www.doctorshealthpress.com.

The Doctors Health Press believes in the healing properties of various superfoods, like pistachios, as well as the benefits of taking vitamins and supplements, Chinese herbal remedies and homeopathy. To see a video outlining the Doctors Health Press' views on homeopathic healing, visit http://www.doctorshealthpress.com/homeopathy.

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