Ultra High-speed Bandwidth a Business Necessity, Will Create Haves / Have Nots in Coming Years, Says @canadaone

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CanadaOne.com was featured in business in bandwidth conference last week where co-founder Julie King outlined the risks facing communities that do not bring in ultra-high speed infrastructure.

Access to affordable, ultra high-speed Internet will shape the economic prosperity of our communities in the future.

Speed = Perception

... companies that have access to ultra high-speed Internet connections will experience a very different world, which in turn will better position them to experience the "eureka" moments that will lead to critical inventions of the future.

What is the difference between a megabyte (Mb), terabyte (Tb) and petabyte (Pb)? The ability to move increasingly large amounts of data through Internet channels could be a critical factor in the economic success of our communities going forward, which relies upon the early implementation of affordable, ultra fast high-speed bandwidth.

Speaking at the Business and Bandwidth conference CanadaOne co-founder and managing editor, Julie King, highlighted the potential loss facing communities that do not ensure businesses and organizations have access to affordable ultra high-speed bandwidth.

"What you see is all there is," said King, citing the work of Nobel laureate Daniel Kahneman. "In terms of innovation, companies that have access to ultra high-speed Internet connections will experience a very different world, which in turn will better position them to experience the “eureka” moments that will lead to critical inventions of the future."

CISCO estimates that 18 exabytes of video will be generated each month in 2013 – which is equal to 1000 petabytes or to 1.36 billion CD-ROMs.

Yet practically speaking, for many business currently using regular high-speed connections, uploading a single ten minute HD video can take anywhere from one to three hours, with Internet for non-video uses dropping to dial-up speeds while the video is uploading.

The impact for businesses, especially small businesses, of ultra high-speed bandwidth is that being able to quickly move large amounts of data will be a distinct competitive advantage.

A key concern is the wide variation in the cost and availability of ultra high-speed Internet in Canada; while some communities are pushing to bring 100 megabit per second (Mbps) connections to businesses for less than $200 per month, others pay $1800 or more for these high-speed connections, or have no way to access ultra high-speed bandwidth even if they are willing to pay.

Smaller companies may not see this as an important issue today, but it is critical that businesses of all size take an active interest in bringing ultra high-speed Internet to their communities.

Since a large barrier to ultra high-speed connectivity is the cost of laying fibre, as a minimum starting point businesses should ask their municipal governments to make a policy to install "dark fibre" conduits when major works projects are done. Even if it is not used immediately, the fibre will be in place for use in the future.

The full video of Julie King's presentation is available online at http://www.canadaone.com/videos_test.html?v=40.

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Alexandra DeLory
CanadaOne
905-927-0015 0
Email >

Julie King
CanadaOne.com
905-927-0015 222
Email >
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