Texas Asian Indians for Responsible Government Gives Political Voice to Indian Community

First and Second Generation Indian Americans Shape Public Policy and Governmental Affairs

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Flags of Texas and India

"Many Indian origin people are now leaders in an array of professional fields and small business, but it is time to match this progress with political action and leadership now too."

Austin, TX (PRWEB) June 21, 2012

Indian Americans living in the US State of Texas now have a non partisan organization that is working to give them greater standing in the political arena. Though this community has made great leaps forward economically and socially, it has remained mostly on the sidelines politically, with only a few exceptions. "Many Indian origin people are now leaders in an array of professional fields and small business," states Narasimha Barve, one of the founders of TAIRG, or Texas Asian Indians for Responsible Government. "But it is time to match this progress with political action and leadership now too."

TAIRG supports candidates and officeholders who have shown their commitment to the Asian Indian community in some way, and gives their endorsement to such people regardless of political party affiliation, provided they can demonstrate this commitment. "We welcome our elected officials to contact us by phone or email, or fill out our questionnaire online," Barve exclaims. "Once endorsed by our board, they have the support of the Indian community, and are free to use our name, and a quote from our organization on any campaign literature."

Founded by a group of retired professionals, and their adult children who were born and raised in America, the idea for TAIRG came about from listening to the concerns of the various Indian Associations within the larger community. It was found that political opinions were diverse, and stretched across the political spectrum, but participation was individual. Oftentimes, the high profile candidates were the only ones known to most voters. Highlighting local or regional elected officials that had played a part in assisting the Indian community became important, so that these people could then gain the recognition that they deserved.

Currently based in the state capital of Austin, TAIRG looks to expand to the Houston and Dallas/Plano areas in the near future. Other plans include starting a PAC, or political action committee, to further support endorsed candidates. The organization also looks to groom and back members of the Indian community itself, who choose to run for public office. For more information, visit TAIRG.org, or the organization's facebook page at facebook.com/tairgorg.


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