British Salt Reduction Efforts Harmful and Flawed According to Salt Institute

Share Article

The UK Department of Health finally released its long awaited National Diet Survey which measured the dietary consumption of salt in English adults (aged 19-64 years) and found no statistically significant change in salt intake from 2008.

Salt Institute logo

Salt Institute logo

Americans currently consume approximately 1.5 teaspoon of salt, placing them right in the middle of the healthy range,” said Lori Roman, President of the Salt Institute.

The UK Department of Health finally released its long awaited National Diet Survey which measured the dietary consumption of salt in English adults (aged 19-64 years) and found no statistically significant change in salt intake from 2008. This despite the intense, well-funded anti-salt campaign waged by WASH (World Action on Salt and Health) and the UK Food Standards Agency, as well as the concerted effort by the food industry to reduce the salt in processed foods.

“The food industry has reduced the sodium levels in processed foods by 10-30 percent in the past few years, but people are still consuming the same amount of salt,” said Morton Satin, Vice President of Science and Research for the Salt Institute. “Either consumers are making up the difference by adding salt themselves, or they are eating more food just to satisfy their body’s demand for sodium – which would be a highly negative development for the ongoing obesity epidemic.”

The British salt reduction effort and salt consumption recommendations also go directly against the preponderance of the medical research. A recent review published in the American Journal of Hypertension by Alderman and Cohen examined 23 observational studies covering some 360,000 individuals and found negative health outcomes for the low levels of salt consumption recommended both in the UK and in the US. This study found that both Americans and Britons currently consume about the right amount of salt.

The British Department of Health report did state that there was a statistically significant but very small (1.4 g) reduction in dietary sodium between this survey and the one conducted by the Food Standards Agency in 2001. It should be noted however that many researchers question the base consumption figures used in that particular study. Regardless the Department of Health recommends cutting salt consumption levels even further.

"The research clearly finds that eating less than a teaspoon or more than 2.5 teaspoons of salt would place consumers at risk and that Americans currently consume approximately 1.5 teaspoon of salt, placing them right in the middle of the healthy range,” said Lori Roman, President of the Salt Institute. “The debate on how much salt people should eat is over and we have to base our nutritional recommendations on the actual evidence.”

The Salt Institute is a North American based non-profit trade association dedicated to advancing the many benefits of salt, particularly to ensure winter roadway safety, quality water and healthy nutrition.

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Morton Satin
Visit website