Crime Prevention Products Warns How Easily Counterfeit Money is Made

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Modern technology has made it all too fuss-free to print fake money – for this reason counterfeit detection methods are becoming increasingly important.

Britain has seen a deluge of fake £20 notes in recent years, and with the fact that almost everyone now has access to colour printers, it’s vital that people safeguard themselves from coming into contact with counterfeit money

Respected online security provider Crime Prevention Products seeks to educate the public about how simple it is to produce fake money these days, as well as to inform people that there are some effective yet affordable ways to identify forgeries.

Currency creation was once a highly difficult endeavour and very few people had the right machinery or skills to get the job done. But with the development of modern technology, unscrupulous criminals need only to press a button and use the half tone technique.

The halftone method is how all pictures and graphics in magazines etc. are reproduced – the original image is electronically scanned and separated out into its cyan, yellow, magenta and black half tones, from which all subsequent colours can potentially be made.

Colour copiers make it simple for almost anyone to forge bank notes, since the machine automatically scans the image and separates its primary halftones. Computer printers do the same, producing fake money that on quick glance cannot often be distinguished from the real thing.

For busy retailers and other people who are often receiving payment in cash, Crime Prevention Products advise the use of both money pens and UV lamps for effective counterfeit detection.

Money pens are the simplest and most affordable way to check whether a bank note is real or not, since its ink reacts to non-genuine paper such as that used in home or office printers. All a person needs to do is draw a small line on the note – if the ink remains clear or goes slightly yellow, it demonstrates the money is real. If the ink turns brown or grey however, the note is definitely suspect and should not be accepted - especially given the fact that banks do not redeem people for receiving forged notes.

In addition, UV lamps are increasingly being used by finance companies and other organisations globally, since apart from being good for property recovery when items are marked by a UV pen that is invisible to the naked eye, official modern currency is being designed with special features that a UV lamp will immediately highlight.

These counterfeit detection methods described are not only a simple way to ensure fake money does not get the chance to circulate, they are also highly affordable – money pens retail for only around £2, while UV lamps can range from as little as £5 and even some of the most advanced models for ultra busy businesses cost approximately £39.

CEO of http://www.c-p-p.co.uk, Terry Rattee, commented: “Britain has seen a deluge of fake £20 notes in recent years, and with the fact that almost everyone now has access to colour printers, it’s vital that people safeguard themselves from coming into contact with counterfeit money. The good news is that measures to detect forgeries from the genuine article are progressing, and there are some very affordable products to do just that.”

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Terry Rattee
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