Learning Vs. Training – Sales Training from Digital Media Training – Learn and Lead – Increased Sales Activity, Lead Generation and Shorter Sales Cycle

Digital Media Training introduces three major flaws in the delivery of learning content. Current research now points toward three major flaws in delivery that, independently or collectively, adversely affect the ability of adults to learn. Many adult education settings offer strong content. Not all of their courses, however, offer instructional design and delivery that actually engage learners and get them to participate actively. So: What are the specific instructional design flaws that leave students with little or nothing to show for the investment of their time and money? Digital Media Training wanted to know, because DMT’s driving purpose is to create and deliver engaging and effective course content for adult learners.

  • Share on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Share on LinkedInEmail a friend

Digital Media Training & M.O.S.T. (Multimedia Ongoing Sales Training)

This "small bites" philosophy assumes that the student should receive only as much information as he or she can comfortably engage with in a single attempt. When that small bite is completed, the student can move on to the next bite.

New York, NY (PRWEB) July 04, 2012

Digital Media Training introduces three major flaws in the delivery of learning content. Current research now points toward three major flaws in delivery that, independently or collectively, adversely affect the ability of adults to learn.

At some point, most adult learners have a strange experience. They choose a course whose title and content seem interesting, and find that its delivery falls flat.

Somehow, the instructor fails to engage a motivated participant. Almost nothing sticks, despite the fact that most or all of the students may have been keenly interested in the topic to begin with. If they don't (or can't) transfer out of the class ... they simply suffer through it. Either way, they often find they are unable to recall many, or any, potent details that the instructor shared.

Why does this happen? Research suggests that at least part of the answer lies, not in the content of the course, but in instructional design and delivery.

"Withdrawal and unsuccessful completion appear to be associated with a number of different aspects of teaching and learning ... (including) uninspiring, "boring," or poorly structured teaching ... (and) inadequate or poor course design." This quote is from Paul Martinez's Improving Student Retention and Achievement.

According to Kim Bahr and Rebecca Bodrero's Case Study: Engaging Learners in the Synchronous Distance Environment, "effective learning involves participation."

Many adult education settings offer strong content. Not all of their courses, however, offer instructional design and delivery that actually engage learners and get them to participate actively. So: What are the specific instructional design flaws that leave students with little or nothing to show for the investment of their time and money? Digital Media Training wanted to know, because DMT’s driving purpose is to create and deliver engaging and effective course content for adult learners.

Digital Media Training found that the best current research now points toward three major flaws in delivery that, independently or collectively, adversely affect the ability of adults to learn.

Those flaws are:

  • Flaw #1: Cognitive Overload
  • Flaw #2: Overreliance on Elaborative Studying
  • Flaw #3: Insufficient Self-Pacing

A major advantage of the "small bites" approach, particularly when content is delivered via the Internet or some other self-paced medium, is its ability to synchronize with a self-paced learning cycle. Once a motivated learner can access an instructional plan that allows him or her to learn across multiple platforms, set all or part of his or her own schedule, and pursue small chunks of material at his or her own pace, retention improves. By improving delivery, breaking training into self-paced, easy-to-navigate content bursts, and relying more heavily on the Internet, Digital Media Training is seeing the following:

  •     Solid retention, thanks to shorter and more frequent assessments;
  •     Deeper engagement over time, including voluntary engagement with new course content;
  •     Much more aggressive implementation of the concepts shared, whether participants are seasoned salespeople or newcomers to the profession of sales; and, last but not least,
  •     Higher revenue and commission figures.


Contact

Follow us on: Contact's Facebook Contact's Twitter

Attachments

Digital Media Training Overview Digital Media Training Overview

Digital Media Training Overview