Federal Three-Year Grant Assists the Fair Housing Legal Clinic at The John Marshall Law School

Share Article

With a 20-year history of working on behalf of those discriminated in their housing choices, The John Marshall Law School Fair Housing Legal Clinic announces $840,000 in new HUD funding to help continue its initiatives.

The grant will help the Clinic continue its broad-based, full-service work assisting those who have been discriminated against in their housing choices.

With a 20-year history of working on behalf of those discriminated in their housing choices, The John Marshall Law School Fair Housing Legal Clinic announces $840,000 in new HUD funding to help continue its initiatives.

Work on behalf of those discriminated in their housing choices will continue through the Fair Housing Legal Clinic at The John Marshall Law School in Chicago thanks to a three-year grant of nearly $840,000 from the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).

The grant will help the Clinic continue its broad-based, full-service work assisting those who have been discriminated against in their housing choices. This signifies an ongoing partnership between HUD and The John Marshall Law School. HUD has been helping fund operations at the Clinic since 1994.

During the next three years, the Clinic will focus on educating more than 110 law students in housing law. They will be trained by professors and attorney fellows on how to assess information to determine discrimination. Students also will be conducting investigations that pinpoint discrimination patterns, and be preparing cases for hearings or court action.

The Clinic staff and students will be presenting programs that help educate the public on the federal Fair Housing Act.

The Clinic serves as a training ground for law students interested in fair housing law while giving them the opportunity to participate in federal and state court litigation and in federal, state, county, city and village administrative proceedings.

Through coursework and hands-on training, students learn how cases are investigated and prepared. They are given opportunities to interview clients, help draft pleadings, and prepare motions and hearings for a temporary restraining order and preliminary injunction. Students learn how to conduct discovery. With the 711 license, which entitles them to represent clients, the Clinic students assist in trials and hearings under the supervision of an attorney.

To learn more about the work of the Fair Housing Legal Clinic, visit http://www.jmls.edu/fairhousing.

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Marilyn Thomas
John Marshall Law School
312.427.2737 661
Email >
Visit website