46% of GraphicDesign.com Readers Say Learning to Code is "Necessary"

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A recent article on GraphicDesign.com written by Swiss web designer Mirko Humbert asked, "Should you add coding to your graphic design toolbox?". Nearly half of GraphicDesign.com readers – 46% – responded, "Yes, it has become a necessary skill" to the question, "Should graphic designers learn how to code?".

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Even if you're a designer who hates web design, I think it is necessary to at least know the basics of HTML and CSS coding in order to have a successful career in this field.

A recent article on GraphicDesign.com written by Swiss web designer Mirko Humbert asked, "Should you add coding to your graphic design toolbox?" Humbert presented arguments for and against graphic designers taking the time to learn to code websites from the ground up and concluded by asking readers for their take.

Nearly half of GraphicDesign.com readers – 46% – responded, "Yes, it has become a necessary skill" to the question, "Should graphic designers learn how to code?" Accordingly, coding has become increasingly important in the graphic design world.

A total of 29% of respondents answered, "Maybe, it depends on the situation," while just 25% said, "No, I'm not a programmer." In essence, 75% of industry members agreed that a working knowledge of web coding is needed in some capacity.

Readers weighed in en masse at the end of Humbert's article, with several stressing the importance of honing a graphic designer's core competency and letting coding take a back seat. In that camp was "Alex Ilechukwu," who wrote, "I think graphic designers should focus more on pushing graphic design to the limits. If coding should be involved, it should be under the umbrella of graphic design."

Another GraphicDesign.com reader, "Nirandada," took the opposite viewpoint: "Being able to design and code makes a graphic designer independent. He becomes whole; these skills complement each other. It not a bad idea to be skillful in both."

GraphicDesign.com regulars also debated whether focusing on web coding could erode a person's design abilities. After all, as the old saying goes, it can be nearly impossible to be all things to all people. "Simon" outlined that conundrum: "I don't think designers should code, it just limits your own creativity. A designer should be free to push design to its limits and then ask the programmer to make it work. This is the only way design and functionality of any product get better."

"Elizabeth" took a middle-of-the-road approach, arguing that designers should know enough about coding to be able to communicate clearly with a professional programmer: "Even if you're a designer who hates web design, I think it is necessary to at least know the basics of HTML and CSS coding in order to have a successful career in this field."

This week, a GraphicDesign.com feature article focuses on how often and to what degree designers should follow up after interviews. The poll article can be found HERE. Two poll questions appear at the end of it for all readers to answer:

1. Should you follow up with a thank you e-mail or letter after an interview?
2. If you don't hear back from a company, how many times should you try reaching out before giving up?

Visit GraphicDesign.com to weigh in.

About GraphicDesign.com

GraphicDesign.com is a product of Terran Marketing and a leading source of news and information devoted entirely to the graphic design industry. Employers, students, and freelancers come to GraphicDesign.com to read and discuss current news, information, and events in the graphic design industry.

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Julia Wild
Terran Marketing
892 East Steger Town Road, Suite #206
Rockwall, TX 75032
Phone: (540) 908-2195
E-Mail: julia(at)graphicdesign(dot)com

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