Chronic Pain Management Is Focus of Newest ACP Medical Home Builder Module

The American College of Physicians (ACP) has added a new module to help medical practices provide optimum care to patients with chronic pain. Medical Home Builder 2.0 provides primary care practices with an easy-to-use, self-paced way to improve office operations, quality and/or transition to a Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) model. Practical yet inexpensive, Medical Home Builder 2.0 now features 23 modules, an online community and hundreds of resources in a virtual library.

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The American College of Physicians (ACP) has added a new module to help medical practices provide optimum care to patients with chronic pain.

Medical Home Builder is a robust yet easy-to-use online tool that enables clinicians and their staffs to measure and—where needed—improve patient care and office workflow based on the Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) model.

Philadelphia, PA (PRWEB) July 26, 2012

The challenges of treating patients who experience chronic pain are addressed in the most recent Medical Home Builder module, Chronic Pain Management. The module explains how to develop and maintain office procedures to guide the care given patients with chronic pain to help minimize risk, yet ensure that they receive optimum care.

This addition to the popular online practice management tool from the American College of Physicians (ACP) is designed to help medical practices treat patients with chronic pain and help staff identify and manage patients with a high risk of prescription drug misuse.

Medical Home Builder is a robust yet easy-to-use online tool that enables clinicians and their staffs to measure and—where needed—improve patient care and office workflow based on the Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) model. It is entirely self-paced and self-directed.

“The physical, psychological and regulatory aspects of chronic pain management present considerable challenges for medical practices,” said Dr. Michael S. Barr, ACP’s senior vice president for the division of medical practice, professionalism and quality. “Managing Chronic Pain addresses policies and procedures as well as staff competencies needed to deliver optimal patient care. Medical practices need to develop resources for patients who require treatment beyond medication—a multi-modality treatment incorporating physical and psychological support,” he said.

Among the many recommendations, the module encourages practices to establish appropriate workflow when patients with chronic pain are seen initially and for follow-up.

Medical Home Builder 2.0 users are automatically enrolled in an online community of practices that is committed to improving patient care and identifying office efficiencies. Not all practices are committed to becoming medical homes—but all will find great value among the variety of modules available and the guidance that is provided.

“All members of participating practices have access to all of the content in the Medical Home Builder including peer-to-peer videos and a community discussion forum where questions can be posed to colleagues,” Dr. Barr concluded.

The Chronic Pain Management module was written with extensive contributions from Daniel P. Alford, MD, MPH, FACP, FASAM; Associate Professor of Medicine and Assistant Dean of Continuing Medical Education, Boston University School of Medicine; and Leanne M. Yanni, MD; Bon Secours Richmond Health System - Palliative Medicine; Richmond, VA.

This module was made possible by funding from Endo Pharmaceuticals, Inc. For more information, visit http://www.medicalhomebuilder.org.

About the American College of Physicians
The American College of Physicians is the largest medical specialty organization and the second-largest physician group in the United States. ACP members include 132,000 internal medicine physicians (internists), related subspecialists, and medical students, residents and fellows. Internists specialize in the prevention, detection and treatment of illness in adults. Follow ACP on Twitter and Facebook.


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