Neurological Drug Development is Long-Term High-Risk/High-Reward Challenge

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Medmeme, LLC. reports on pharmaceutical firms’ efforts to develop treatment for neurological diseases, drugs to either stop or reverse the diseases progress.

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A new syndicated TrendsmemeTM Report: Neuroscience-Neurological Diseases has been released by Medmeme, LLC., a global leader in comprehensive, integrated medical and science information database platforms. In 2011 central nervous system (CNS) drugs were estimated to account for 16% of the global market for pharmaceuticals (approximately $125 billion), the largest single slice. Yet the diseases that are the most active subjects of neurological research today, in large part because the conditions affect so many people and the number of new patients is growing rapidly, do not yet have therapies available that can either stop or reverse the diseases.

The TrendsmemeTM Report: Neuroscience-Neurological Diseases primarily concentrates on the three leading diseases in the category: Alzheimer’s disease (AD) currently with 5.1 million people estimated to be suffering in the US, and estimated to double every five years for people over age 65; Parkinson’s disease (PD) estimated currently at 1 million patients, or more, in the US; and multiple sclerosis (MS). A major plus factor of research on these diseases is that it also offers windows into issues relevant broadly across the neurological therapeutic category. This report covers status of indications, companies, drugs, people, positioning of dominant pharmaceutical firms, medical conference meetings and presentations, relevant development issues, and more.

Despite the fact that CNS drugs need 40% longer on average in clinical trial than non-CNS drugs, have a higher trial failure rate, and take 13% longer in the approval process, pharmaceutical firms accept the long-term commitment vital to success. As an example reported on, Janssen and Pfizer have devoted ten years to clinical trials in more than 10,000 patients for the investigational AD immunotherapy bapineuzumab (now in Phase III AD trials). Other firms discussed also have stepped up to the challenge of developing CNS treatments. They are: Lundbeck, Forest, GlaxoSmithKline, Eli Lilly, Bayer, Sanofi, Novartis, Biogen Idec, UCB Pharmaceuticals, Acorda, Teva, Eisai, and Merck-Serono, among others.

Medmeme CEO Mahesh Naithani discusses the challenges: “We not only talk about diseases, drugs, companies, but also about other basics essential to overcome R&D challenges. Finding reliable biomarkers for measuring disease progression in Alzheimer’s is such an essential. For example, until recently AD could only be confirmed through autopsy. Now physicians diagnose using neurophysiologic and other medical testing. But for clinical trials the FDA hasn’t said how it will interpret such resulting data to assess drug efficacy for disease progression. FDA approval of Lilly’s new diagnostic test is interesting in ruling out Alzheimer’s, and perhaps it will eventually help with early detection. However, at present there are no universally accepted markers for AD disease progression, so this remains an area of unmet need, as we’ve reported. Another interesting development we’ve reported on is an initiative by the National Institutes of Health to leverage neuroscience resources with grants and other resources for seven teams of investigators at top institutions. When we look at the credentials of the experts at these institutions in our Profilememe database we are much encouraged about potential progress in this therapeutic area.”

The syndicated TrendsmemeTM Report: Neuroscience - Neurological Diseases can be purchased separately, or, along with other MedMeme reports in the new series, at discounted pricing. To learn more, contact us, or see our website, http://www.medmeme.com/reports.

Medmeme, LLC
Yan Barshay, Executive Vice President
+1 212-725-5992
yan(at)medmeme(dot)com

Medmeme, LLC.
Ray Wright, Vice President, Sales
+1 508-278-4595
rwright(at)medmeme(dot)com

A new syndicated TrendsmemeTM Report: Neuroscience-Neurological Diseases has been released by Medmeme, LLC., a global leader in comprehensive, integrated medical and science information database platforms. In 2011 central nervous system (CNS) drugs were estimated to account for 16% of the global market for pharmaceuticals (approximately $125 billion), the largest single slice. Yet the diseases that are the most active subjects of neurological research today, in large part because the conditions affect so many people and the number of new patients is growing rapidly, do not yet have therapies available that can either stop or reverse the diseases.

The TrendsmemeTM Report: Neuroscience-Neurological Diseases primarily concentrates on the three leading diseases in the category: Alzheimer’s disease (AD) currently with 5.1 million people estimated to be suffering in the US, and estimated to double every five years for people over age 65; Parkinson’s disease (PD) estimated currently at 1 million patients, or more, in the US; and multiple sclerosis (MS). A major plus factor of research on these diseases is that it also offers windows into issues relevant broadly across the neurological therapeutic category. This report covers status of indications, companies, drugs, people, positioning of dominant pharmaceutical firms, medical conference meetings and presentations, relevant development issues, and more.

Despite the fact that CNS drugs need 40% longer on average in clinical trial than non-CNS drugs, have a higher trial failure rate, and take 13% longer in the approval process, pharmaceutical firms accept the long-term commitment vital to success. As an example reported on, Janssen and Pfizer have devoted ten years to clinical trials in more than 10,000 patients for the investigational AD immunotherapy bapineuzumab (now in Phase III AD trials). Other firms discussed also have stepped up to the challenge of developing CNS treatments. They are: Lundbeck, Forest, GlaxoSmithKline, Eli Lilly, Bayer, Sanofi, Novartis, Biogen Idec, UCB Pharmaceuticals, Acorda, Teva, Eisai, and Merck-Serono, among others.

Medmeme CEO Mahesh Naithani discusses the challenges: “We not only talk about diseases, drugs, companies, but also about other basics essential to overcome R&D challenges. Finding reliable biomarkers for measuring disease progression in Alzheimer’s is such an essential. For example, until recently AD could only be confirmed through autopsy. Now physicians diagnose using neurophysiologic and other medical testing. But for clinical trials the FDA hasn’t said how it will interpret such resulting data to assess drug efficacy for disease progression. FDA approval of Lilly’s new diagnostic test is interesting in ruling out Alzheimer’s, and perhaps it will eventually help with early detection. However, at present there are no universally accepted markers for AD disease progression, so this remains an area of unmet need, as we’ve reported. Another interesting development we’ve reported on is an initiative by the National Institutes of Health to leverage neuroscience resources with grants and other resources for seven teams of investigators at top institutions. When we look at the credentials of the experts at these institutions in our Profilememe database we are much encouraged about potential progress in this therapeutic area.”

The syndicated TrendsmemeTM Report: Neuroscience - Neurological Diseases can be purchased separately, or, along with other MedMeme reports in the new series, at discounted pricing. To learn more, contact us, or see our website, http://www.medmeme.com/products/syndicated-reports/reports/trendsmeme-reports.

Medmeme, LLC                     
Yan Barshay, Executive Vice President                 
+1 212-725-5992                        
yan(at)medmeme(dot)com                        

or

Ray Wright, Vice President, Sales                     
+ 1 508-278-4595
rwright(at)medmeme(dot)com

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