Murray Requests Testing on Propofol Bottle—Results Could Overturn Conviction

New Jersey personal injury lawyers Console & Hollawell P.C. weigh in on the July 30th motion filed by Conrad Murray’s legal team. According to CNN the motion is requesting that an appeals court allow the testing of residue left in a bottle that supposedly housed the dose of Propofol that killed Jackson.

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A lot is dependent on the outcome of the motion filed by Murray’s legal team and should unveil in the months to come

Marlton, NJ (PRWEB) August 03, 2012

Conrad Murray, best known as the personal physician to pop legend Michael Jackson in the months leading up to his death, still maintains that he is innocent in the death of the King of Pop. Last November he was found guilty of involuntary manslaughter and was sentenced to four years in prison—a term he is currently serving.

The motion filed on July 30 requested that an appeals court allow the testing of residue left in a bottle that supposedly housed the dose of propofol that killed Jackson, according to a CNN report. A motion for the same testing has already been rejected twice by the trial judge who explained that Murray’s legal team should have requested the testing before the trial began.

Newark wrongful death lawyer Richard P. Console, Jr. was intrigued by this request and is eager to see how it all plays out. “There is a lot riding on this motion as it could not only overturn the manslaughter conviction, it could also have a significant impact on the pending wrongful death suit being pursued by the Jackson family.”

According to the CNN report, Dr. Steven Shafer served as the prosecution’s expert witness with regards to the likely medical circumstances that led to Jackson’s death. Shafer contended that the most likely scenario, backed up by evidence, was that Murray mixed a 100 milliliter bottle of propofol with lidocaine and placed it in an IV drip and left the room. Murray’s defense team is asserting that if the bottle is tested, there will be no traces of lidocaine thus supporting Murray’s version of the events. Murray alleged that Jackson injected himself with the propofol, and that he would not have known to mix it with lidocaine to ease the sting of the drug, according to CNN.

If the testing of the container is allowed and Murray’s version of the events is found to be true, it could result in the conviction being overturned. Should this occur it could jeopardize the wrongful death suit currently being pursued against AEG Live and the producers of Jackson’s film “This Is It.”

The civil lawsuit, filed in California Superior Court in 2010 by Jackson’s mother on behalf of herself and as the guardian ad litem for his three children, alleges that AEG Live retained Murray as Jackson’s personal physician and thus is responsible for the ensuing damages.

The complaint states that, “By requiring Jackson to be treated by a specific doctor [Murray]—a doctor that AEG was instructing to simply make sure Jackson gets to rehearsals and shows—under threats to Jackson that it would essentially ruin his career, AEG committed independent negligence against Jackson.”

NorthJersey.com reported that the legal team representing Jackson in the civil matter is working in conjunction with a Newark personal injury attorney on the case. Recently, the plaintiffs filed several subpoenas to witnesses they will be calling in the case and the suit is finally developing despite having been filed two years ago.

“A lot is dependent on the outcome of the motion filed by Murray’s legal team and should unveil in the months to come,” Console, himself a Newark personal injury attorney, stated.

[ Superior Court of the State of California, County of Los Angeles, Central District, Case No. BC445597