Sikh Gurdwara Open House: Sikh Americans invite all Americans to visit their local Gurdwaras (Temples) this Sunday, August 12

In an expression of unity and in support of the Oak Creek victims, Sikhs nationwide invite Americans to visit their local Gurdwaras this Sunday, August 12.

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To honor the memory of all those lost or injured, the entire Sikh American community asks their fellow Americans to sit down for lunch this upcoming Sunday at their nearest Gurudwara.

New York, NY (PRWEB) August 07, 2012

In light of the tragic shooting this past Sunday in Oak Creek, WI, Sikh Gurdwaras around the country will be hosting open-houses this Sunday, August 12, to help educate the broader American community on the Sikh Faith and allow them to take part in a communal meal with their local Sikh neighbors. Anyone may join and partake in any portion of the service they choose.

Information on both gurdwara visits and vigils is available at http://www.whoaresikhs.com. Monetary support for the families of the victims of the attacks can be made through IndieGoGo. In 36 hours, more than $82,000 was raised to support the cause.

“A tragic loss for America shows that much work towards peace, community, and understanding is needed,” said Dawinder Sidhu, a Sikh-American law professor at the University of New Mexico. “To honor the memory of all those lost or injured, the entire Sikh American community asks their fellow Americans to sit down for lunch this upcoming Sunday at their nearest Gurudwara.” Sikh temples are open to all people, regardless of caste, creed, or background.

Sikhism is a monotheistic religion founded in fifteenth century India and is currently the world’s fifth largest religion. Sikhs have been in the United States for over 100 years. Today there are more than 700,000 Sikhs in the United States, many of whom contribute to American society in politics, business, and military service. The values of the Sikh faith include working hard, earning an honest living, fighting injustice for all and dedicating time and resources to charity and equality.

Sikhs are easily distinguishable because they do not cut their hair as a symbol of their faith and beliefs. Sikh males typically wear a turban to cover their hair -- a practice that has encountered significant discrimination and harassment in the aftermath of the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001.


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