DoctorsHealthPress.com Reports on Study that Caffeine Could Help Treat Parkinson’s

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The Doctors Health Press, a publisher of various natural health newsletters, books, and reports, including the popular online Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin, is reporting on a study out of Montreal and Toronto Canada that suggests caffeine could help improve motor function in Parkinson’s patients.

DoctorsHealthPress.com Reports on Study that Caffeine Could Help Treat Parkinson's

DoctorsHealthPress.com Reports on Study that Caffeine Could Help Treat Parkinson's

The Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin article reports that the researchers found that caffeine resulted in a non-significant reduction in sleepiness. However, daytime drowsiness improved. Caffeine also reduced the total symptoms score of the patients.

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The Doctors Health Press, a publisher of various natural health newsletters, books, and reports, including the popular online Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin, is reporting on a study out of Montreal and Toronto Canada that suggests caffeine could help improve motor function in Parkinson’s patients.

As reported in Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin (http://www.doctorshealthpress.com/brain-function-articles/this-stimulant-could-help-treat-parkinsons), caffeine has a conflicted story when it comes to boosting health. This is because caffeine is a stimulant. It can boost the performance of various systems in the body, but it can also overstimulate these same systems, causing negative health effects.

The Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin article “This Stimulant Could Help Treat Parkinson’s” reports that other studies have already shown a positive link between caffeine and Parkinson’s disease risk. Caffeine has consistently been found to be a natural remedy that prevents Parkinson’s from taking hold in the body. However, no one has yet studied the effect of caffeine on the symptoms of Parkinson’s once it has already been diagnosed in a patient.

This was the inspiration for the Canadian research team’s study. They conducted a six-week randomized, controlled trial of caffeine in Parkinson’s patients to assess its effects upon daytime drowsiness, motor symptom severity, and other symptoms, the article outlines.

Parkinson’s patients with daytime drowsiness were given 100 milligrams (mg) of caffeine twice daily for three weeks. This was followed by 200 mg twice daily for three weeks. Half of the group was given a placebo at this point to act as the control group. The researchers then measured sleepiness, fatigue, depression, quality of life, and severity of motor systems.

The Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin article reports that the researchers found that caffeine resulted in a non-significant reduction in sleepiness. However, daytime drowsiness improved. Caffeine also reduced the total symptoms score of the patients, along with ushering in improvements in motor function. The research team concluded that caffeine could improve motor function in Parkinson’s patients.

The article notes that the reason Parkinson’s affects motor function is that both the disease and muscle control start in the brain. The brain is responsible for orchestrating the movement of all the muscles. Parkinson’s interferes with this process by damaging certain areas of the brain.

(SOURCE: Postuma, R.B., et al., “Caffeine for treatment of Parkinson disease: A randomized controlled trial,” Neurology, Aug. 1, 2012. [Epub ahead of print.])

Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin is a daily e-letter providing natural health news with a focus on natural healing through foods, herbs and other breakthrough health alternative treatments. For more information on Doctors Health Press, visit http://www.doctorshealthpress.com.

The Doctors Health Press believes in the healing properties of various superfoods, like pistachios, as well as the benefits of taking vitamins and supplements, Chinese herbal remedies and homeopathy. To see a video outlining the Doctors Health Press' views on homeopathic healing, visit http://www.doctorshealthpress.com/homeopathy.

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