September is National Brain Aneurysm Awareness Month

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During the month of September, help The Brain Aneurysm Foundation provide critical awareness, education, support and research funding to reduce the incidence of brain aneurysms.

Every year, 30,000 people in the United States will suffer from a ruptured brain aneurysm. 40% of these individuals will die. Those that survive often face significant challenges, greatly impacting their lives and the lives of their families.

In 2011, the U.S. Senate passed S. Res. 248, filed by U.S. Senator John Kerry and co-sponsored by U.S. Senators Scott Brown and Olympia Snow, designating September as National Brain Aneurysm Awareness Month. Many states have also signed on, including California, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Hawaii, Illinois, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, and Wisconsin.

H.Res.341, filed by Representatives Edward Markey and Patrick Tiberi, is still pending. Supporters of The Brain Aneurysm Foundation are urged to visit http://bafound.rallycongress.com and sign the petition encouraging their U.S. Representative to support H. Res. 341 and help increase public awareness and understanding of brain aneurysms.

The Brain Aneurysm Foundation is the nation’s only nonprofit organization solely dedicated to providing critical awareness, education, support and research funding to reduce the incidence of brain aneurysms. In 2012, communities throughout the nation will join with The Brain Aneurysm Foundation to host events and fundraisers with a common goal in mind – to help raise public awareness and understanding of brain aneurysms. For more information on local events and informational materials on awareness efforts, please visit http://www.bafound.org.

A brain aneurysm is a weak bulging spot on the wall of a brain artery very much like a thin balloon or weak spot on an inner tube. Over time, the blood flow within the artery pounds against the thinned portion of the wall and aneurysms form silently from wear and tear on the arteries. As the artery wall becomes gradually thinner from the dilation, the blood flow causes the weakened wall to swell outward. This pressure may cause the aneurysm to rupture and allow blood to escape into the space around the brain. The ruptures, many of which occur without warning, can lead to brain damage, stroke, or death. However, if a brain aneurysm is diagnosed early with proper screening, it can be treated before it ruptures.

In 2012, The Brain Aneurysm Foundation will award ten grants to individuals conducting scientific research directed at early detection, improved treatment modalities, and technological advances that will ultimately improve outcomes for patients with brain aneurysms. The grants will be awarded at the Sixth Annual Brain Aneurysm Foundation Research Grant Symposium on September 20, 2012 in St. Louis, MO.

This year’s recipients include Christoph J. Griessenauer, M.D., Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, at the University of Alabama at Birmingham; Chad W. Washington, M.D., Department of Neurosurgery, Washington University School of Medicine; Kamil W. Nowicki, MD-PhD Training Program, University of Florida; Irene P. Khan, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, Villanova University; Kenji Shimada, M.D., Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Care, University of California, San Francisco; Brian P. Walcott, M.D., Neurosurgery Resident, Massachusetts General Hospital & Harvard Medical School; Michael Chen, M.D., Assistant Professor in Neurology, Neurosurgery and Radiology, Rush University Medical Center; Jinglu Ai, M.D., Ph.D., Research Associate, St. Michael’s Hospital, University of Toronto; Robert F. James, M.D., Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery, East Carolina University, Brody School of Medicine; and Alim P. Mitha, M.D., SM, FRCSC, Cerebrovascular/Endovascular/Skull Base Neurosurgeon, Assistant Professor of Clinical Neurosciences and Radiology, Foothills Medical Centre, University of Calgary.

For more information about The Brain Aneurysm Foundation, the research grants and events taking place around the United States, please visit http://www.bafound.org.

About the Brain Aneurysm Foundation
The Brain Aneurysm Foundation was established in Boston, MA on August 19, 1994 as a public charity. The Brain Aneurysm Foundation is the nation’s only nonprofit organization solely dedicated to providing critical awareness, education, support and research funding to reduce the incidence of brain aneurysm ruptures. The organization also provides education materials and awareness information to health care professionals and the general population, as well as providing support for patients and their loved ones.

The Brain Aneurysm Foundation relies on fundraising support from individuals and organizations to continue to fund education and research to promote early detection of brain aneurysms, which ultimately saves lives. For more information, visit: http://www.bafound.org.

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