Crucial Measures Are Being Taken to Halt the Escalation of Ivory and Rhino Horn Smuggling Throughout the World

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Crucial measures are being taken to halt the escalation of ivory and rhino horn smuggling according the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES).

Photo by Craig Kasnoff

CITES is Working to Curb the Smuggling of Elephant Ivory and Rhino Horns - Photo by Craig Kasnoff

The Standing Committee has made full use of its compliance and enforcement procedures, which are a unique feature of CITES, in ensuring legal, sustainable and traceable trade. CITES Secretary-General John E. Scanlon.

The 62nd meeting of the Standing Committee of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), adopted crucial measures to halt the escalation of ivory and rhino horn smuggling. The meeting held in Geneva in late July, came one month after the Rio+20 Conference recognized the important role of CITES in its outcome document The Future We Want.

Some 300 observers, including world specialists working for governments, intergovernmental bodies, the private sector and non-governmental organizations, contributed to the deliberations. The meeting attracted a record number of 50 observer organizations and was open to the media.

“The Standing Committee has made full use of its compliance and enforcement procedures, which are a unique feature of CITES, in ensuring legal, sustainable and traceable trade,” said CITES Secretary-General John E. Scanlon. “They have also recognized the need to work closely with all countries affected by the illegal supply chain of elephant ivory – range, transit and destination – if we are to tackle this problem effectively.”

According to CITES, the Committee decided unanimously to take urgent measures to tackle the current poaching and smuggling crisis threatening elephant and rhino populations. The 17 Committee members requested countries and territories that are most affected by illegal ivory trade to adopt a series of immediate measures to control domestic markets and combat smuggling.

The Committee analyzed the drivers behind the exploding demand in rhino horn and requested Viet Nam to report by September 2012 on its actions to combat illegal trade in rhino horn. The country was encouraged to conclude, as a matter of urgency, the inventory of rhinoceros hunting trophies and verify their non-commercial use.

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ABOUT CITES:

With 175 Member States, CITES remains one of the world's most powerful tools for biodiversity conservation through the regulation of trade in wild fauna and flora. Thousands of species are internationally traded and used by people in their daily lives for food, housing, health care, ecotourism, cosmetics or fashion.

CITES regulates international trade in close to 35,000 species of plants and animals, including their products and derivatives, ensuring their survival in the wild with benefits for the livelihoods of local people and the global environment. The CITES Permit System seeks to ensure that international trade in listed species is sustainable, legal and traceable.

ABOUT ENDANGERED EARTH NEWS:

Endangered Earth News was created by Endangered Species Journalist Craig Kasnoff with the goal of promoting the plight of endangered species and how to save them from extinction.

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