GraphicDesign.com Reveals Tips for Writing an Effective Job Post

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Spiegel-Gotsch critiques job descriptions that read more like a child's Christmas wish list than a serious attempt at finding an employee. The Creative Group Executive Director Donna Farrugia gives some great tips on creating accurate graphic design job descriptions.

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Overly verbose job descriptions can be intimidating and prevent well-qualified candidates from applying to an opening, and ultimately lead to a smaller candidate pool from which to choose.

"Whether you're a Fortune 500 company or a small shop, finding talent costs time and money, so why not do whatever can be done to mitigate those costs and get maximum results?" That attention-grabbing, yet head-spinning question opened an article currently front and center on GraphicDesign.com from Nicole Spiegel-Gotsch. The piece looks at tips for writing effective graphic design job posts.

Spiegel-Gotsch criticiqued job descriptions that read more like a child's Christmas wish list than a serious attempt at finding an employee. Writing over-the-top, ambitious job descriptions can attract overqualified applicants, for example, who will then jump ship should a more desirable job arise. "Wish list" job descriptions can also discourage qualified applicants from applying.

Spiegel-Gotsch also cautioned about attracting a person who isn't an ideal fit. How would that happen? "Descriptions that lack focus or inaccurately represent the main type of work that needs to be done day-to-day," said Spiegel-Gotsch, can result in "candidates whose balance of skills don't match well with the actual position, leading to dissatisfaction on both sides."

How can graphic design employers create effective job descriptions, then? How can they spend time spent hiring and training candidates who are perfect matches? To find out, Spiegel-Gotsch interviewed The Creative Group Executive Director Donna Farrugia, who emphasized the importance of creating an accurate job title and including the title of the person the employee reports to and any positions within the firm that person oversees.

Outlining core responsibilities, including day-to-day tasks and big-picture items, is of grave importance, as is accurately describing qualifications. Expectations of a candidate should also be included, which are defined as "the immediate and long-term objectives for the position and a specific definition of what constitutes exceptional performance," according to Farrugia. The compensation package should be spelled out as much as possible.

Job descriptions that read more like novels should be avoided. As the article warns, "Overly verbose job descriptions can be intimidating and prevent well-qualified candidates from applying to an opening, and ultimately lead to a smaller candidate pool from which to choose." Finally, so-called "soft skills" and "interpersonal abilities" should be part of any effective job description.

At the end of the article which can be found HERE, readers are asked three multiple choice questions about their own HR experiences:

How often have you been frustrated by poorly written or overly broad job descriptions?
Do you think employers are sometimes losing out on qualified candidates as a result of "wish list"-type job postings?
Has a job ever turned out to be very different than what was represented in the description?

New articles with reader polls are featured each week on GraphicDesign.com. Visit the site to weigh in today!

About GraphicDesign.com:

GraphicDesign.com is a leading source of news and information devoted entirely to the graphic design industry. Employers, students, and freelancers come to GraphicDesign.com to read and discuss current news, information, events as well as to find graphic design firms and to post or search for graphic design jobs.

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Julia Wild
Terran Marketing
julia(at)graphicdesign(dot)com

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