Justice Antonin Scalia to Help Dedicate Goldberg Courtroom at The John Marshall Law School

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The Justice Arthur J. Goldberg Courtroom at The John Marshall Law School will officially be dedicated at a noon ceremony on Sept. 28, 2012, with United States Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia and Goldberg family members joining the unveiling.

The Justice Arthur J. Goldberg Courtroom at The John Marshall Law School will officially be dedicated at a noon ceremony on Sept. 28, 2012, with United States Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia and Goldberg family members joining the unveiling.

The ceremony at the law school, 315 S. Plymouth Ct., Chicago, celebrates the life and work of former United States Supreme Court Justice Goldberg who was a member of the John Marshall faculty from 1938 to 1942, and returned as an adjunct faculty member in 1947 and 1948.

“We are honored to have Justice Scalia come to the law school for this ceremony,” said John E. Corkery, the law school’s dean. “This courtroom is a wonderful memorial to Justice Goldberg, an outstanding faculty member who made an impression on our students, our city, the country and the world.”

The Goldberg Courtroom is the largest of the three courtrooms at the law school. The 100-seat capacity room on the fourth floor sweeps across the Jackson Street side of the law school’s State Street building. The judges’ bench accommodates up to seven justices for hearings. The room has the latest technology, including projectors and screens for viewing from any vantage point in the room. The courtroom is used on a regular basis for law school classes, special events and mock trials.

Goldberg, a Chicago native, was a faculty member at John Marshall while he was building his law practice and his reputation as a fierce supporter of the labor movement’s rights to organize and bargain collectively.

In 1938, he represented striking newspaper employees for the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO). From that initiative, he went on to become general counsel for the CIO in 1948. Goldberg served as a negotiator and chief legal adviser when the two major unions—American Federal of Labor (AFL) and the CIO—agreed to merge in 1955.

Goldberg also served as general counsel of the United Steelworkers of America.

A prominent figure in the Democratic Party and labor union politics, Goldberg was appointed Secretary of Labor by President John F. Kennedy in 1961. When United States Supreme Court Justice Felix Frankfurter resigned in 1962 because of poor health, Goldberg was appointed by Kennedy to the Supreme Court. Goldberg served on the court until 1965 when, at the urging of President Lyndon B. Johnson, he resigned from the court to become United Nations ambassador. Goldberg was the last Supreme Court justice to have served in the United States Cabinet.

Goldberg served at the UN until 1968 when he left the position and joined the law firm of Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison in New York City. He lost his 1970 bid for the U.S. Senate seat from New York and returned to Washington, D.C. to enter private practice.

President Jimmy Carter appointed Goldberg United States Ambassador to the Belgrade Conference on Human Rights in 1977, and awarded him the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1978.

He died in 1990 at age 81.

About The John Marshall Law School
The John Marshall Law School, founded in 1899, is an independent law school located in the heart of Chicago’s legal, financial and commercial districts. U.S. News and World Report America’s Best Graduate Schools 2013 ranks the law school’s Legal Writing Program sixth in the nation. The publication also ranked the Intellectual Property Law Program17th. John Marshall offers the nation’s only graduate program in employee benefits. Its program in Information Technology and Privacy Law remains the only graduate law program in the country that emphasizes privacy as part of its core curriculum. And, The John Marshall Law School is one of three law schools in the country offering graduate programs in real estate law.

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Marilyn Thomas
John Marshall Law School
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