Motorists like cameras but many still don’t trust them, says IAM

Share Article

Eighty-two per cent of people think it is acceptable for authorities to use speed cameras, however 45 per cent think that raising income is still a main reason for their use, according to the results of the IAM’s annual speed camera survey.

Speed cameras are an essential part of the policing toolkit and are becoming more and more accepted, but it’s clear that some people need reassuring about their purpose and funding.

Eighty-two per cent of people think it is acceptable for authorities to use speed cameras, however 45 per cent think that raising income is still a main reason for their use, according to the results of the IAM’s annual speed camera survey.

Speed awareness courses are also popular – 72 per cent of people think that speed awareness courses are a good idea.

The results show that people think speed cameras are beneficial to road safety. Eighty-five per cent of people think that speed cameras have helped to contribute to the fall in road deaths since 1990s.

The results for the home nations vary:

  • Speed cameras are least popular in Wales where 32 per cent of people think their use is not acceptable. The survey also shows that Wales has the highest rate of people caught speeding – In the last three years 27 per cent of people were caught speeding or knew someone in the household who was caught speeding.
  • In contrast, cameras are most popular in Scotland where only 15 per cent think they are unacceptable. Only 14 per cent of Scottish were caught speeding or knew someone in the household who was.
  • In England, 19 per cent of people were convicted or knew someone in their household who was caught speeding in the last three years. 20 per cent think their use is not acceptable.

Generally, people find that speed cameras are more acceptable than five years ago. In 2007, 30 per cent of respondents said speed cameras were not acceptable, a figure which has reduced every year to 16 per cent this year.

IAM chief executive Simon Best said: “Simply catching and fining drivers does not change drivers’ awareness of the hazards of excessive speed. The popularity of speed awareness courses show that the public think training is the best option.

“Speed cameras are an essential part of the policing toolkit and are becoming more and more accepted, but it’s clear that some people need reassuring about their purpose and funding.”

ENDS

Notes to editors:        
1. Speed Cameras: A snapshot of public opinion published August 2012.

This report is based on a survey which we have commissioned every summer for the last six years. The survey was undertaken by Lake Market Research.

2. The IAM is the UK’s largest independent road safety charity, dedicated to improving standards and safety in driving, motorcycling and cycling. The commercial division of the IAM operates through its occupational driver training company IAM Drive & Survive. The IAM has more than 200 local volunteer groups and over 100,000 members in the UK and Ireland. It is best known for the advanced driving test and the advanced driving, motorcycling and cycling courses. Its policy and research division offers advice and expertise on road safety.

ENDS ALL

Media contacts:
IAM Press Office – 020 8996 9777
press.office@iam.org.uk
ISDN broadcast lines available
iam.org.uk

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Tanvir Nandra
Institute of Advanced Motorists
02089969777
Email >

Media