Don’t You Become a Neti Pot Statisitic! Dr Murray Grossan Offers Expert Opinion on Avoiding Neti Pot Deaths

Share Article

Dr Murray Grossan, author of Free Yourself from Sinus and Allergy Problems, permanently offers seven steps to follow so you won’t become a Neti Pot statistic. In Louisiana two persons using the Neti Pot for nasal irrigation developed a fatal infection due to a brain eating amoeba. How to avoid this.

Even if you use sterile water for irrigation, your own bacteria end back in the Neti Pot and multiply. If you irrigate at a high pressure, you force your own bacteria into otherwise healthy areas.

Dr Murray Grossan, author of Free Yourself from Sinus and Allergy Problems, permanently offers seven steps to follow so you won’t become a Neti Pot statistic.

In Louisiana two persons using the Neti Pot for nasal irrigation developed a fatal infection due to a brain eating amoeba called N.fowlari. These deaths were investigated and were attributed by Dr Jonahan Yoder of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to using tap water contaminated by the amoeba for nasal irrigation.

Dr Grossan notes: “The Neti Pot is like a tea kettle that you fill with water and salt, lay your head to one side, and allow the saline solution to go in one nostril and out the other. Because of this side position, the solution is directed to the top of the nose, where the brain sits. The solution can also pool at the nasal opening to the ear. Since you don’t have good control of the pressure of the solution, a high pressure may force infection from an infected area to an uninfected area. If you irrigate at a high pressure, you force your own bacteria into otherwise healthy areas. A similar too high pressure can also develop when patients use a squeeze bottle for nasal irrigation. With the bottle, solution flows in one nostril and out the other, so that infected material can land in healthy areas."

Dr Joder cautions that for nasal/sinus irrigation, it is safer to use distilled water, or water that has been boiled for at least one minute at sea level, and for three minutes at elevations of 6,500 feet or higher.

Dr Grossan advises. “Persons with allergy or sinus problems should be aware that there is more to avoiding bad results than just using distilled or boiled water. This is because of the high incidence of contamination among persons who irrigate with the Neti Pot."

These reports include:

In the May 2012 review of contamination of irrigation devices in the American Journal of Rhinology and Allergy, contamination rates of these types of irrigation devices as high as 80% were reported!

Specialist J. Lee reported that even after he gave careful instruction to his patients, 50% showed infection due to Pseudomonas aeroginosa in the irrigating instrument.

Dr Keen reported that he gave a fresh bottle to his patients with chronic rhinosinusitis, and instructions about contamination. After two weeks 97% showed contamination, 50% with staph aureus.

Dr Grossan states: “When you irrigate with these devices, there is flowback: mucus and bacteria from your own nose may flow back into the spout or nozzle and infect the container. Even if you use sterile water for irrigation, your own bacteria end back in the Neti Pot and multiply.”

In a report by Dr Nsouli, 60% of his chronic nasal infection patients were cured when they stopped daily irrigation. He concluded that daily removal of the nasal immunity factors such as lysozyme was a factor. Without these normal defense factors, the concentrated bacteria from flowback were put back into the nose on the next irrigation.

Dr Grossan’s Advice: “Why not avoid irrigation? Humming and drinking hot tea with lemon/honey are factors that stimulate good nasal cilia movement. Normally the nasal cilia move bacteria out of the nose and this avoids infection. You don’t want to remove natural immune factors by needless irrigation. If the tea and humming doesn’t do it, use an irrigation device that pulses at a rate to stimulate nasal cilia movement. Once the cilia are normal, there is no need for further therapy. With a controlled low pressure, you avoid forcing bacteria into healthy areas. Don’t forget, a good night’s sleep is always best therapy."

Seven Steps to avoid Neti Pot/Squeeze Bottle problems:
1.    Avoid irrigation unless indicated
2.    Before using pot and bottle irrigation, consider tea and humming therapy
3.    Use distilled or boiled water
4.    Maximize cleansing and sterilizing instructions.
5.    If you do require irrigation, use a device that has steady flow, pulses at the right frequency to improve cilia movement, so that minimum bacteria into healthy areas.irrigation is needed.
6.    Use a steady flow at low pressure.
7.    A good night’s sleep is the best therapy.

Further information and details are at Dr Grossan’s “Free Yourself from Sinus and Allergy Problems” (available Amazon). See http://www.grossan.com and http://www.grossaninstitute.com
Contact: drgrossan (at) yahoo (dot) com
310 275 8738

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Murray Grossan

Dora Numez, Marketing
Follow us on
Visit website