Oklahoma Agencies Fighting The Growing Wave Of Prescription Drug Damage

Law enforcement is one of the essential fronts in the fight to save lives that might be lost to prescription drug abuse. Narconon Arrowhead joins these efforts with rehabilitation and prevention.

  • Share on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Share on LinkedInEmail a friend

Canadian, OK (PRWEB) September 07, 2012

At one time, the Midwest was primarily known for its problem with methamphetamine. While there’s still a serious problem with this highly addictive substance, Oklahoma joins the rest of the US and much of the world in experiencing fast growth in the abuse of prescription drugs. And in Oklahoma and elsewhere, this growth in prescription drug abuse is killing people.

According to the Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics (OBN), drug-related deaths overall have risen 126% since 2001. Now, prescription drugs are involved in nearly eight out of ten of those deaths.

As well as targeting physicians who indiscriminately prescribe these drugs, the OBN has recently made it easier for families to get rid of drugs that might fall into the hands of teens or young adults who might want to abuse them.

Leftover prescriptions sitting in medicine cabinets is a primary way that young people get the first drugs they abuse. In May 2012, the OBN announced the placement of 122 drug disposal boxes around the state where unwanted drugs can be disposed of. These white boxes, resembling post office drop boxes, are located in sheriff’s offices and police departments. For example, there are five in Tulsa, two in Muskogee, one in Durant and one in McAlester. The complete list can be found at: http://www.ok.gov/obndd/documents/TakeBackBoxes.pdf.

The purpose of these boxes is to take drugs that might addict or even kill someone out of circulation. Unwanted drugs can be dropped off at any of these locations (no liquids, inhalers or syringes).

Corporations And Rehabilitation Programs Provide Other Fronts Of Attack

While it’s important to take drugs off the street through law enforcement actions, it’s equally important to reduce the demand for the drugs. This is accomplished by helping addicted people lose the compulsion to abuse these drugs and by teaching youth the problems that result from abusing drugs and alcohol.

“At Narconon Arrowhead, we are dedicated to reducing the demand for drugs like these that are killing our people right at home,” said Derry Hallmark, Director of Admissions at the large rehab facility in Canadian. “In our years in Oklahoma, we have helped more than ten thousand people lose their desire for drugs. Every time we send home a person who has recovered from addiction, we know we have reduced the customers for drug dealers and traffickers.”

Narconon Arrowhead also works with corporations, schools and civic clubs to provide drug education classes. Both youth in school and employees have benefited from the eight-part curriculum that provides a thorough understanding of the risks of substance abuse.

“We could not succeed in our work without the cooperative efforts of law enforcement, schools, churches and other dedicated groups in Oklahoma,” Mr. Hallmark concluded.
“We are pleased to be part of the solution to a better life for Oklahomans.”

For more information on the drug rehabilitation program or drug prevention curriculum, call Narconon Arrowhead at 1-800-468-6933.


Contact

  • NARCONON ARROWHEAD

    1(800) 468-6933
    Email

Attachments

Damage from prescription drugs in Oklahoma.