Motorists divided on CO2 incentives

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Nearly half of motorists (48 per cent) say they would not consider a more eco-friendly vehicle if Vehicle Excise Duty (VED) tax breaks were increased according to a poll by the IAM (Institute of Advanced Motorists)1. Fifty per cent think that it is fair that VED on cars is based on the CO2 it produces.

Eco-friendly vehicles haven’t got the appeal so much so motorists are willing to pay higher costs in VED to compromise. Motorists aren’t fully convinced of how low CO2 emissions are beneficial to them, or society.

Nearly half of motorists (48 per cent) say they would not consider a more eco-friendly vehicle if Vehicle Excise Duty (VED) tax breaks were increased according to a poll by the IAM (Institute of Advanced Motorists)1. Fifty per cent think that it is fair that VED on cars is based on the CO2 it produces.

Thirty-two per cent think parking permit prices should be based on the size or length of the vehicle (the more space it takes up, the more you pay). While twenty-nine per cent think everyone should pay the same. Only five per cent of respondents felt that the CO2 emissions the vehicle produces should influence permit costs.

Low Emission Zones (LEZs) are slightly more popular. LEZs were introduced in London in 2008 to reduce pollution from heavy diesel vehicles. Forty-six per cent of drivers think they that they should be introduced for private vehicles, 41 per cent disagree.

Twenty-two per cent of motorists think that driving has no impact on global warming. This is in line with other surveys that show 7 per cent of people think global warming is not happening and seventeen per cent believes it is panic about an exaggerated threat.2

IAM chief executive Simon Best said: “Eco-friendly vehicles haven’t got the appeal so much so motorists are willing to pay higher costs in VED to compromise. Motorists aren’t fully convinced of how low CO2 emissions are beneficial to them, or society.”

“While more can be done to increase awareness about the benefits of eco cars, drivers can do their bit by changing to green driving to help reduce CO2. Looking ahead and anticipating hazards will mean less stopping and starting and a smoother journey.”

IAM eco driving tips:

  • Keep your vehicle moving for as long as possible, even in traffic queues. This is far more fuel efficient than stopping and starting, so slow down earlier, to avoid braking as harshly and often.
  • Stick to the speed limit. This offers a good compromise between economy and getting somewhere. Remember, speed limits are a maximum, not a target.
  • Reverse into parking bays. If you do all the manoeuvring with a hot engine you can drive straight off when you come back and warm the engine up more quickly.
  • Check your vehicle regularly to ensure it operates efficiently. In particular check the condition of your tyres, and measure tyre pressures when they’re cold.
  • Remove unnecessary weight, including roof racks, car clutter and heavy items in the boot. The more weight you carry in the car, the more fuel you’ll burn.

ENDS

Notes to editors:        

1. The results are from an online poll on the IAM’s website. The poll was conducted in August 2012 and received 2, 547 respondents.
2. The Guardian, Economic climate has not affected views on global warming – poll, http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2012/jun/25/economic-climate-public-global-warming-poll.
3. The IAM is the UK’s largest independent road safety charity, dedicated to improving standards and safety in driving, motorcycling and cycling. The commercial division of the IAM operates through its occupational driver training company IAM Drive & Survive. The IAM has more than 200 local volunteer groups and over 100,000 members in the UK and Ireland. It is best known for the advanced driving test and the advanced driving, motorcycling and cycling courses. Its policy and research division offers advice and expertise on road safety.

ENDS ALL
Media contacts:
IAM Press Office – 020 8996 9777
press.office(at)iam(dot)org(dot)uk
ISDN broadcast lines available
iam.org.uk

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Tanvir Nandra
Institute of Advanced Motorists
02089969777
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