New Environment and Forestry Sections Published at Sciences Social Network

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The Environment and Forestry Sciences are two new key biology branches covered by the Sciences Social Network ScienceIndex.com. The users of the website monitor 233 scientific journals publishing in these two branches and submit the most recent and significant articles for inclusion in ScienceIndex.com. While the site currently contains a total of 1,747,691 posts, it features 27,957 articles in these two sections. ScienceIndex.com was established in 1998 to index the very latest news, headlines, references and resources in all fields of biology, business, chemistry, engineering, geography, health, mathematics and society.

Environment Sciences @ ScienceIndex.com

Environment Sciences

Environment & Forestry Sciences @ ScienceIndex.com

ScienceIndex.com is a Environment and Forestry Sciences Social Network established in 1998 to index the very latest news, headlines, references and resources from science journals, books and websites worldwide. The site covers news in all fields of biology, business, chemistry, engineering, geography, health, mathematics and society. In the field of Biological Sciences, the site has now included the two new categories Environment and Forestry. While the Environment section covers the external physical conditions affecting growth, development, and survival of organisms, and their management, the Forestry section covers the cultivation, maintenance, and development of forests.

ScienceIndex.com's BioSciences Category covers life and living organisms, including their structure, function, growth, origin, genetics, and distribution. Its ten sections include Agriculture, Anatomy, Biotechnology, Ecology, Environment, Forestry, Genetics, Microbiology, Physiology and Zoology. Users can receive alerts for newly published content in this category by subscribing to ScienceIndex.com's BioSciences Category RSS feed.

ScienceIndex.com's Environment Section covers the external physical conditions affecting growth, development, and survival of organisms, and their management. It currently contains 23,459 articles partly derived from 197 scientific journals. The latest articles in this category are also available through an Environment Section RSS feed. One of the latest additions in this section focuses on carbon footprint and air emissions inventories for US honey production. The authors' life-cycle modeling of one complete commercial supply chain (raw honey production, transport to a processor, and processing) shows that total life cycle greenhouse gas emissions range from 0.67 to 0.92 kg CO2 equivalent/kg of processed honey. Truck transport of bees is the dominant contributor of both greenhouse gas emissions and criteria pollutants within the life cycle of raw honey production. Another recently included article investigates how the origin of fresh household waste affects its ability to be biodegraded in the city of Kara in Togo. The biodegradability of waste from the city of Kara correlated with their origin even though the physical characteristics of the two deposits studied differed greatly.

ScienceIndex.com's Forestry section covers the cultivation, maintenance, and development of forests. It currently contains 4,498 articles partly derived from 36 scientific journals. The latest articles in this section are also available through an Forestry Section RSS feed. One recently included article in this section analyzes the effects of African mahogany species on soil chemistry, tree diversity and the application of leaf morphometrics for provisional seed zonation during restoration of degraded dry semi-deciduous forest ecosystems in Ghana. The authors' results indicate that mixed mahogany species foster the re-colonization of a diversity of native tree species and accelerate the regeneration rate in the restoration of fire-degraded dry semi-deciduous forest ecosystems compared to natural regeneration. Another article investigates the influence of hydromorphic soil conditions on greenhouse gas emissions and soil carbon stocks in a Danish temperate forest. The authors conclude that hydromorphic soils are potential hotspots for CH4 production and reduced uptake of atmospheric CH4, but their limited area covered by such soils implies that upland soils are most important in terms of soil C stock and the non-CO2 greenhouse gas budget.

The Sciences Social Network currently contains over 1.74 million posts distributed among its' 75 categories. 79,207 users monitor 12,747 journals publishing within the scope of the site. Since new science content is discovered in real-time, the delay between original publication and appearance at ScienceIndex.com is no more than two days. The site provides an advanced search feature which suggests up to ten closely related articles for a search and every displayed post.

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George Maine
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