75% of GraphicDesign.com Readers Frustrated by Poorly Written Design Job Descriptions

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Seventy-five percent of GraphicDesign.com readers, an overwhelming sum, answered "All the Time" to the question "How often have you been frustrated by poorly written or overly broad job descriptions."

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My frustration often lies in the hiring manager's narrow view of the skill sets required to fulfill their needs – often skill sets prescribed by a creative department that the manager doesn't even use.

A recent poll article on GraphicDesign.com revealed that a vast majority of the design community has run into poorly written graphic design job descriptions, perhaps leading to inferior candidates being placed in coveted positions and the hiring process becoming complicated and costly. The poll article can be read HERE.

Seventy-five percent of GraphicDesign.com readers, an overwhelming sum, answered "All the Time" to the question "How often have you been frustrated by poorly written or overly broad job descriptions?"

Nicole Spiegel-Gotsch wrote the exposé, entitled "Finding the Right Designer for the Job: Tips for Writing a Good Job Post from The Creative Group." Just one-quarter of GraphicDesign.com readers stated that they "Sometimes" had been irritated by sub-par job descriptions, while not a single member of the community selected "Never." Apparently, poorly written job descriptions are a pandemic.

As if that response weren't evidence enough of employers circulating lackluster job postings, every single respondent on GraphicDesign.com answered "Yes" to the question "Do you think employers are sometimes losing out on qualified candidates as a result of 'wish list' type job postings?" "Wish list" postings can attract overqualified applicants who may soon jump ship for a more alluring opportunity and, at the same time, scare off qualified applicants.

Finally, 86% of respondents, or nearly nine in ten, answered "Yes" when asked if a job they took had turned out to be very different than what was presented in a job description. Jobs can evolve over time, but an 86% failure rate conveying the correct job description is an alarming statistic.

Several GraphicDesign.com readers weighed in on the issue, including Ron Lucarelli, who shared his job hunting experience: "My frustration often lies in the hiring manager's narrow view of the skill sets required to fulfill their needs – often skill sets prescribed by a creative department that the manager doesn't even use."

Another GraphicDesign.com reader pointed out that many job postings don't include the name of the company that's hiring or a description of what the company does. As he put it, "Knowing the name of the company posting an ad helps me determine whether or not I want to follow through with an application."

The same poster concluded that a company could benefit from giving away information: "By identifying itself in its job postings, a company stands to save both itself and its potential applicants time that might otherwise be wasted due to a blind or anonymous ad."

This week, GraphicDesign.com dives into the wonderful world of Photoshop plugins. The article, written by Mirko Humbert, picks the top 10 free Photoshop plugins and can be found HERE. At the end, readers are asked about their own Photoshop habits.

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CONTACT:
Julia Wild
julia(at)graphicdesign(dot)com

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