News of a Second, Historical Conference on America’s Legal System and a Related Book Hits the Airwaves

The second symposium of “The Matthew Fogg Symposia On The Vitality Of Stare Decisis In America” is scheduled for October 25 - 26, 2012 at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles, California. Zena Crenshaw-Logal is the event coordinator and author of “Examining the Vitality of Stare Decisis in America”, a paperback account of Fogg’s debut symposium in 2011. In a pre-release review, Professor Diane J. Klein of LaVerne College of Law describes the tension between judicial accountability and judicial independence, acknowledging that related “. . . debates rage on — and the Matthew Fogg Symposium so well-described in Crenshaw-Logal’s book promises to continue to make valuable contributions to it, by bringing together a unique group of interested and informed constituencies.”

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"Exploring the Vitality of Stare Decisis in America"

Fogg Debut Symposium Report

Anyone thinking he or she knows the problems plaguing America’s legal system or figuring they are predictable, largely unavoidable shortcomings of an otherwise pristine institution, can learn much from this symposium on stare decisis.

Crown Point, Indiana (PRWEB) September 10, 2012

The second symposium of “The Matthew Fogg Symposia On The Vitality Of Stare Decisis In America” is scheduled for October 25 - 26, 2012 at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles, California. Zena Crenshaw-Logal is the event coordinator and author of “Examining the Vitality of Stare Decisis in America”, a paperback account of Fogg’s debut symposium in 2011. She explains that “stare decisis” means “to stand by that which is decided” and notes the Latin phrase is also known as the doctrine of precedent.

“To the extent our rights and responsibilities are unclear, Americans predict them in light of case law or precedent — whether consciously through legal proceedings or subconsciously as we live and order our affairs; so a court’s inexplicable departure from precedent can be very disruptive” says Crenshaw-Logal. “Of course what one person finds inexplicable, another may consider within a range of lawful outcomes” she continues. According to Crenshaw-Logal, “the Fogg symposia allow litigants to work with law professors, public interest attorneys, judges, and other civic minded Americans to envision that range of lawful outcomes; consider when court decisions may actually reflect unethical if not criminal conduct as opposed to error and/or administrative difficulties such as budget constraints; and contemplate mechanisms to ensure fair and impartial court proceedings.”

Diane J. Klein of LaVerne College of Law joins Fogg’s 2012 panel of law professors. In a pre-release review, she describes the tension between judicial accountability and judicial independence, acknowledging that related “. . . debates rage on — and the Matthew Fogg Symposium so well-described in Crenshaw-Logal’s book promises to continue to make valuable contributions to it, by bringing together a unique group of interested and informed constituencies.” In addition to law professors and legal professionals, those constituents hail from coalitions of public and private sector whistleblowers as well as civil rights activists and grassroots legal reform advocates. Inspiring their participation are symposia co-sponsors: the acclaimed Government Accountability Project (GAP), the cutting-edge National Black Justice Coalition (NBJC), and leading grassroots legal reform advocates, National Forum On Judicial Accountability (NFOJA) and POPULAR (Power Over Poverty Under Laws of America Restored).

During the afternoon of Thursday - October 25, 2012, Fogg symposium guests are scheduled to discuss “lessons learned” from his 2011 symposium on stare decisis among other topics. Crenshaw-Logal interjects, “if participants earnestly consider each other’s input, some irreconcilable differences may emerge, but the exchange should eventually reveal threats to stare decisis and its role in preserving the rule of law in America that less diverse audiences are almost sure to miss.” Dr. Andrew D. Jackson, a NFOJA and POPULAR co-administrator, proposes that “anyone thinking he or she knows the problems plaguing America’s legal system or figuring they are predictable, largely unavoidable shortcomings of an otherwise pristine institution, can learn much from the symposia that retired Chief Deputy U.S. Marshal Matthew Fogg has made possible.”

Course material and admission to Fogg’s two-day, 2012 symposium costs as little as $7, but for only $45, guests receive a copy of “Examining the Vitality of Stare Decisis in America”, course material, catered lunch, and dinner featuring keynote speaker, the Honorable DeAnn Salcido, a retired judge of the California Superior Courts and founder of Judicial Action Watch Society (JAWS). George Stokes, Sr., National Program Chair for POPULAR, says “I am on the frontlines of communities, working most often with average Americans in struggles for justice, and I encourage them to support Mr. Fogg’s program; it is not above our heads — it provides assistance we need.”

Friday - October 26, 2012, the second day of Fogg’s 2012 symposium, will feature Professor Lara A. Bazelon of University of California, Hastings College of the Law, and her article “Putting the Mice in Charge of the Cheese: Why Federal Judges Cannot Always Be Trusted to Police Themselves and What Congress Can Do About It”, 97 Ky. Law J. 439 (2008-2009); Professor Diane J. Klein of LaVerne College of Law in Ontario, California and her article “Distorted Reasoning: Gender, Risk-Aversion, and Negligence Law,” 30 Suffolk U.L. Rev. 629 (1997); the Honorable Judge DeAnn Salcido (ret.); and Professor Colin Starger of the University of Baltimore School of Law and his article "Expanding Stare Decisis," Loyola of Los Angeles L. Rev. (forthcoming Fall 2012).

To learn more, please visit http://www.matthewfoggevent.com

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