Rising Anti-Semitism and Intolerance Are the Fruit of Atheism and Secular Humanism, Not Christianity, Author Says

An expert on Hitler and the holocaust and its relationship to the Bible and Christianity speaks out against a rise in pro-nazi sentiment and association of such sentiment with the Christian 'right.'

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hitler and the holocaust

If something is bad, it is religiously motivated, but if it is good, it's humanistic. For those who think this way, it is natural to latch on to the occasional statement by Hitler that seems to indicate he was a Christian,

La Crosse, WI (PRWEB) September 09, 2012

Coming on the heels of a recent spate of anti-semitic graffiti in New Jersey, the author of a book on Hitler and Christianity wants to remind people that such hateful attitudes and behaviors have nothing to do with the Christian faith.

Of recent historical figures that we simply cannot forget, Adolph Hitler must top the list. Worldwide, his name brings controversy, from the forced name-change of a shop in India (the "Hitler" shop) to mud-slinging politics in America. Joseph Keysor, author of "Hitler, the Holocaust, and the Bible," states that "Hitler's genocidal acts and infamy are the fruit of a life dedicated to secular philosophies that took root and flourished in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries." As we see a rise in anti-Semitism world-wide, Keysor reminds us to remember the past to protect our future.

Atheists such as Richard Dawkins and Sam Harris, have advanced the idea that religion is at the root of genocidal and murderous regimes and of intolerance. Keysor responds, "They have boldly termed communism a 'religion.' They are rewriting history to fit the paradigm that religion does more harm than good and should be summarily dismissed." Keysor continues, "The mindset that precipitated the brutal murders of millions of Jews, gypsies, and handicapped people is resurging in our world today. If we fail to recognize the true sources of Nazism and the Holocaust, we will repeat them." The current rise in open anti-semitism and dehumanizing treatment of the Roma (gypsies) exemplifies this resurgence.

Keysor adds, "The argument seems to be that if something is bad, it is religiously motivated, but if it is good, it's humanistic. For those who think this way, it is natural to latch on to the occasional statement by Hitler that seems to indicate he was a Christian and dismiss countless reasons to know that, without a doubt, he was anything but."

"Hitler, the Holocaust, and the Bible" does more than just respond to critics, but fights back, showing that the true sources of Nazism and the Holocaust were not the Bible, Martin Luther, and Christian anti-semitism, but rather secular, atheistic and evolutionary thinkers such as Wagner, Nietzchke and Haeckel.

Keysor concludes, "This is not an academic or intellectual exercise. The same attitudes that brought us the Holocaust are ascending—it is even culturally acceptable today to openly advocate eugenics. My book teaches us the lessons of the past so that we can combat and defeat that ascendancy." More information about the book and the author is available at http://www.hitlerandchristianity.com. A kindle edition of the book is also available.

Mr. Keysor is available for interviews. Please make your initial contact by email at keysor(at)hitlerandchristianity(dot)com.


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