Shut Your Mouth when Inhaling and Exhaling This Week, because it’s International Nose Breathing Week

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A majority of Americans breathe more than twice as much as they need to, and that's not healthy, reports the director of Breathing Retraining Center LLC in the San Francisco Bay Area. Mouth-breathing encourages over-breathing, which has been increasing with the pace of modern life, Lisa Bowen said. A Soviet doctor in the 1950s discovered a link between over-breathing and respiratory illnesses such as asthma, allergies, anxiety, snoring and sleep apnea. Educators trained in the breathing-retraining method Dr. Konstantin Buteyko developed initiated the first International Nose Breathing Week this Sept. 10-15 to raise awareness about the vital significance of correct breathing for health and longevity.

"We tell people, you don't eat with your nose, so don't breathe with your mouth," said Lisa Bowen, director of Breathing Retraining Center LLC in the San Francisco Bay Area.

International Nose Breathing Week was dreamed up by educators of the Buteyko Breating Retraining Technique worldwide to raise awareness about the vital significance of correct breathing for health and longevity.

“We tell people, you don’t eat with your nose, so don’t breathe with your mouth,” said Lisa Bowen, director of Breathing Retraining Center LLC in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Mouth-breathing encourages over-breathing, which is linked with asthma, anxiety, allergies, snoring, sleep apnea and other respiratory illnesses, said Bowen, a breathing-retraining coach.

Today it is generally accepted that over-eating is a serious problem that may cause diabetes, heart disease and many other modern illnesses. Over-breathing is similarly bad for us, Bowen said.

Dr. Konstantin Buteyko, a Ukrainian medical researcher who died in 2003, discovered early in his career as a hospital intern in the 1950s that the more patients breathed, the closer they were to death. Suffering from serious hypertension, Buteyko first experimented with deliberate breath control on himself, then successfully tested his hypothesis when called to patients’ bedsides.

Buteyko went on to lead a breathing lab in the Soviet Union for decades. He discovered that adults and children with chronic health problems typically breathe two to three times more than they need to and usually don’t even realize it. He created a breathing-retraining method to overcome the general condition now known as chronic hidden hyperventilation.

According to medical textbooks, the physiological norm is breathing 6 liters of air per minute, Bowen said. In medical studies, people with respiratory and other conditions breathed 11-15 liters of air per minute. The Buteyko technique's goal is to control and reduce symptoms of these conditions by restoring our natural breathing.

A main priority of Buteyko educators is on raising awareness of how mouth-breathing affects kids. Dentists have found that the tongues of mouth-breathing children do not rest correctly on the roofs of their mouths for proper jaw development, and these are the kids who subsequently need braces and develop respiratory illnesses, Bowen said. Correcting a child’s breathing by age 8 can possibly reverse the process, she added.

For more information about International Nose Breathing Week from September 10-15 or the Buteyko Breathing Retraining Technique, contact Breathing Retraining Center LLC at 415-454-3400 or see http://www.BreathingRetrainingCenter.com.

Breathing Retraining Center is holding an event observing International Nose Breathing Week on Thursday, Sept. 13th at Peri Park in Fairfax, CA from 5:30-6:30 p.m., featuring a brief talk and then experiential exercises for adults and games for kids.

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