Happy 225th Constitution Day America! “Publius” Celebrates Cannabinoids, Citizenship and Constitutions by Noting George Washington’s Constitutional Smudge

As the nation celebrates the 225th Anniversary of Constitution Day, and with President Obama’s recent speech on the founding role of citizenship, “Publius” of The Cannabis Papers: A Citizen’s Guide to Cannabinoids, calls attention to the events of 17 September 1787 and George Washington’s message for future Americans.

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“But we also believe in something called citizenship - a word at the very heart of our founding, at the very essence of our democracy.”
President Obama DNC 2012

Chicago, IL (PRWEB) September 17, 2012

As the nation celebrates the 225th Anniversary of Constitution Day, and with President Obama’s recent speech on the founding role of citizenship, "Publius" calls attention to the events of 17 September 1787 and the message George Washington sent future generations of Americans.

September 17th is a national holiday in recognition of the signing of the Constitution on 17 September 1787 and, beginning in 1952, a day to honor citizenship.

Two significant things happened on 17 September 1787, according to Bryan Brickner, publisher and co-author of The Cannabis Papers: A Citizen’s Guide to Cannabinoids.

“The actual signing is well-known, while the other event is rarely discussed – even though the evidence is visible in a “smudge” on the Constitution itself,” said Brickner, who is also author of Article the first of the Bill of Rights (2006), a book on the founding and constitutional representation.

Brickner explained: “George Washington only addressed the http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/ampage?collId=llfr&fileName=002/llfr002.db&recNum=649&itemLink=D?hlaw:1:./temp/~ammem_JPyH::%230020647&linkText=1 [Constitutional Convention __title__ Farrand's Record, 17 September 1787] on the final day, 17 September, and asked for a change to the Constitution; in altering the document a smudge was created in Article 1, Section 2, Clause 3, by the erasure of “fo” in “forty” and the addition of “thi” to make the Constitution read ‘thirty Thousand.’ The change from “forty Thousand” to “thirty Thousand” was Washington’s wish to see a 25% increase in the constitutional representation ratio for We the People.”

President Obama echoed our founding in his 2012 Democratic National Convention acceptance speech:

“As Americans, we believe we are endowed by our Creator with certain inalienable rights - rights that no man or government can take away. We insist on personal responsibility and we celebrate individual initiative. We’re not entitled to success. We have to earn it. We honor the strivers, the dreamers, the risk-takers who have always been the driving force behind our free enterprise system - the greatest engine of growth and prosperity the world has ever known.

“But we also believe in something called citizenship - a word at the very heart of our founding, at the very essence of our democracy; the idea that this country only works when we accept certain obligations to one another, and to future generations.”

“It’s clear the obligations to one another and to the future the President referenced,” noted Brickner, “are derived from the US Constitution; it is also clear that our health is derived from our Cannabinoid System (CS), a 550 million year old mammalian constitution. If the CS is thought of as nature’s healthcare plan, one can think of the Constitution as our nation’s political healthcare plan.”

Brickner also pointed to Brian Frederick’s 2009 book Congressional Representation & Constituents: The Case for Increasing the US House of Representatives, as evidence the idea of constitutional representation is gaining traction: “Frederick uses an empirical analysis to show that having only 435 members in the US House of Representatives, for a nation of over 300 million, effects our representation – our politics. We have not added seats to the US House since the 1910 census; that means the net worth of our representation – of our citizenship – has been in decline for more than 100 years.”

The Cannabis Papers is available on Lulu, Amazon and other online retailers.


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Attachments

Washington's Hemp Seed Love Washington's Hemp Seed Love

Essay #11 from The Cannabis Papers by Publius


Spirited Place to Grow Spirited Place to Grow

Essay #12 from The Cannabis Papers by Publius


Liberty to Change Nixon's Law Liberty to Change Nixon's Law

Essay #13 from The Cannabis Papers by Publius


The Birth of the ECS The Birth of the ECS

Essay #15 from The Cannabis Papers by Publius