Electrolyte Disorder Linked to Post-Op Fatalities

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The importance of Electrolytes in the human body has been well documented in the past few decades with several consumer products actively using this ingredient in their marketing campaigns to show the importance of Electrolytes in proper hydration. However, a recent medical study, as well as a compelling article posted at Health and Wellness portal BeWellBuzz.com, have shown that an electrolyte disorder increases the risk of complications and death sometimes within 30 days after surgery.

The importance of Electrolytes in the human body has been well documented in the past few decades with several consumer products actively using this ingredient in their marketing campaigns to show the importance of Electrolytes in proper hydration. However, a recent medical study as well as a compelling article posted at Health and Wellness portal BeWellBuzz.com; have shown that an electrolyte disorder increases the risk of complications and death sometimes within 30 days after surgery.

Electrolyte balance in the human body is maintained by oral, or in emergencies, intravenous (IV) intake of electrolyte-containing substances, and is regulated by hormones, generally with the kidneys flushing out excess levels. Many people use oral rehydration therapy, by consuming electrolyte drinks containing sodium and potassium salts replenish the body's water and electrolyte levels after dehydration caused by exercise, excessive alcohol consumption, diaphoresis, diarrhea, vomiting, intoxication or starvation.

However, a recent medical study which was published in the Journal Archives of Internal Medicine on September 10th, 2012 have indicated a potential risk to patients who have a medical disorder called preoperative hyponatremia. Patients with this disorder have low sodium levels in the blood. Previous research conducted by the University of Wales in 2006 had linked hyponatremia with increased complications and death in a number of medical conditions, but its association with outcomes during and after surgery has been uncertain, according to the press news release sent by the Journal of Archives of Internal Medicine on September 10th, 2012.

The study which was conducted by Brigham and Woman’s Hospital in Boston, Mass, reviewed more than 964,000 patients who had major surgery at more than 200 U.S. hospitals from 2005 to 2010. The researchers found that about 7.8 percent of the patients had preoperative hyponatremia and that these patients were 44 percent more likely to die within 30 days after surgery than those without the condition.

“We found that preoperative hyponatremia was present in approximately 1 in 13 patients, and this group had a 44 percent increased risk of 30-day perioperative mortality, even after adjustment for all other potential risk factors,” stated Alexander A. Leung, M.D., of Brigham and Women’s Hospital who lead this research study. He continued to state; “Preoperative hyponatremia was also associated with an increased risk of perioperative major coronary events, surgical site wound infections, pneumonia and prolonged hospital stays.”

The news release continued to state that this electrolyte disorder also was associated with a higher risk of major heart events (1.8 percent vs. 0.7 percent), surgical site wound infections (7.4 percent vs. 4.6 percent), and pneumonia (3.7 percent vs. 1.5 percent) and prolonged hospital stays (an average of about one extra day). Although the research has indicated that this condition is cause for concern for medical patients, further studies on how the introduction of Electrolyte therapy can potentially reduce this condition requires additional research to confirm.

There are many additional potential health risks due to lack of Electrolytes in the human body which are discussed in detail in the BeWellBuzz.com article posted below.

http://www.bewellbuzz.com/wellness-buzz/electrolytes

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Larry Oz