Talking Business at Hagley’s Fall Conference

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Oral history and the history of business will be the focus of Hagley’s annual conference on Friday, November 2. Prominent historians will discuss the different ways in which businesses and their role in society can be documented using oral history.

Oral history and the history of business will be the focus of Hagley’s annual conference on Friday, November 2. Prominent historians will discuss the different ways in which businesses and their role in society can be documented using oral history. Hagley especially encourages anyone considering an oral history project to attend. The Fall Conference is free. It will be held Friday, November 2, from 1 to 5 p.m., in the Soda House. Use Hagley’s Buck Road entrance.

     Oral history is a field of study and a method of gathering, preserving, and interpreting the voices and memories of people, communities, and participants in past events. “From multinational corporations to local food venders, business enterprises have created the world we live in,” observed conference organizer Roger Horowitz, who is associate director of Hagley’s Center for the History of Business, Technology, and Society. “The speakers will show the richly varied ways in which oral history can be used to understand how these firms operate, as well as their impact on our daily lives.”

About the Speakers

    In addition to speaking about their projects, presenters will also discuss how the projects were created and how funds were generated to support them. Speakers offer local, national, and international examples.

        Dr. Robert Perks, British Library: “Corporate and Business Oral History: The Opportunities and Challenges,” (keynote address);
    William Becker, George Washington University: “Oral History and the World Bank”;
    David Caruso, Chemical Heritage Foundation: “Documenting Science-based Businesses”;
    Mary Marshall Clark, Columbia Center for Oral History: “The story of a culture business: The Apollo Theater Oral History Project”;
    Sally Hughes, University of California Berkeley Regional Oral History Office: “The Venture Capitalists Oral History Project”;
         Amy Evans Streeter, Southern Foodways Alliance, “The stories behind the making of Southern food”;
    Dr. Doug Boyd: “Oral History and Possibilities of Digital Technology” (closing address)

About the Hagley Center for the History of Business, Technology, and Society

The Hagley Center for the History of Business, Technology, and Society organizes conferences, research seminars, and a public lecture series; it also operates a research grants-in-aid program. Its efforts are designed to bring attention to Hagley's research collections and to generate intellectual dialogue at Hagley.

Hagley Museum and Library

    Hagley Museum and Library collects, preserves, and interprets the unfolding history of American enterprise. For more information, call (302) 658-2400 weekdays or visit http://www.hagley.org.

CONTACT: Meg Marcozzi, Marketing Manager
             (302) 658-2400, ext. 238    mmarcozzi(at)hagley(dot)org

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