DoctorsHealthPress.com Reports on Study; Reading Labels Could Help in Weight Loss

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The Doctors Health Press, a publisher of various natural health newsletters, books, and reports, including the popular online Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin, is reporting on a health breakthrough that suggests being cognizant of what’s in your food is a preventative step against obesity. The study found that consumers who read labels have a body mass index that is 1.49 points lower than those who shop without considering labels. This equals nearly a four-kg reduction in an adult woman who weighs on average 74 kg and is on average 1.62 m tall.

DoctorsHealthPress.com Reports on Study; Reading Labels Could Help in Weight Loss

DoctorsHealthPress.com Reports on Study; Reading Labels Could Help in Weight Loss

This is important information to have, because reading food labels could help people manage their weight. Look closely at the calorie count, the amount of sugar, number of carbohydrates, and the percentage of total fat that is saturated.

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The Doctors Health Press, a publisher of various natural health newsletters, books, and reports, including the popular online Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin, is reporting on a health breakthrough that suggests being cognizant of what’s in your food is a preventative step against obesity. The study found that consumers who read labels have a body mass index that is 1.49 points lower than those who shop without considering labels. This equals nearly a four-kg reduction in an adult woman who weighs on average 74 kg and is on average 1.62 m tall.

As reported in Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin (“Read This Before You Eat That”), the information comes from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, gleaned from 25,000 observations on questionnaires. First they looked at the profile of people who read nutritional labels, and then they looked at their weight.

There were significant differences among the grocery shoppers. Here are a few points that came out of the study:
-- Smokers pay far less attention to food labels. This is likely because they know their lifestyle is not so healthy, so they are less concerned about the nutritional content of food.
-- People who lived in cities took nutritional information into account the most.
-- The more educated a woman, the more likely it was for her to read food labels.
-- For men, 58% habitually or always read the information contained within nutritional labels.
-- For women, that figure is much higher, at 74%.

The associated impact on weight and body mass index was higher among women. This is important information to have, because reading food labels could help people manage their weight. Look closely at the calorie count, the amount of sugar, number of carbohydrates, and the percentage of total fat that is saturated. These are mostly negative things. Then look at the nutritional boost the food offers. If it's swayed too much toward the negative, then reconsider buying the product.

(SOURCE: Loureiro, M., et al., "The effects of nutritional labels on obesity," Agricultural Economics 2012; 43: 333.)

Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin is a daily e-letter providing natural health news with a focus on natural healing through foods, herbs and other breakthrough health alternative treatments. For more information on Doctors Health Press, visit http://www.doctorshealthpress.com.

The Doctors Health Press believes in the healing properties of various alternative remedies, including Traditional Chinese Medicine. To see a video outlining the Doctors Health Press' views on Traditional Chinese Medicine, visit http://www.doctorshealthpress.com/chinesemedicine.

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