Alliums Take Center Stage - Says Longfield-gardens.com

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There are dozens of different varieties of alliums, each with its own special bloom time. By planting several different types, gardeners can enjoy 6 to 8 weeks of carefree color, effectively bridging the season from late spring to mid-summer.

Purple allium gladiator

Planted in fall, these high-flying allium flowers with six-inch flowers are known for adding supreme delight to the late spring and early-summer garden.

Alliums add the color, height, structure and movement that can turn ordinary gardens into something special.

Every flower gardener dreams of having a garden that’s colorful from spring through fall. Planting alliums is one of the surest ways to achieve this. There are dozens of different varieties of alliums, each with its own special bloom time. By planting several different types, gardeners can enjoy 6 to 8 weeks of carefree color, effectively bridging the season from late spring to mid-summer.

“The early alliums begin to bloom just after the last tulips,” says Hans Langeveld of Longfield-Garden.com, an online retailer known for well-priced, top quality flower bulbs and bare root perennials. “This makes them perfect partners to bloom with peonies, irises, roses, astilbes and other early season bloomers.”

Alliums add the color, height, structure and movement that can turn ordinary gardens into something special. Pure white Allium ‘Mt. Everest’ and A. nigrum, are gorgeous in a shade garden. Big blowsy pale lavender alliums like A. christophii shimmer when combined with warm yellows and oranges or dark reddish shades. ‘Purple Sensation’ harmonizes beautifully with whites, blues and purples, and the deep maroon flowers of A. atropurpureum are stunning with heucheras that have lime green or dark red foliage.

From bud opening through full bloom is just Act One of this bulb flower’s performance. After bloom, as their petals fall away, the alliums begin to set seed entering Act Two to bring a more subdued moment to the garden. As the seed heads dry, they present Act Three. Now, set high upon their sturdy stems, the dried golden brown seed heads stand tall amidst lush late season flowers, holding on through late summer into fall, sometimes into winter.

“The seed heads are every bit as cool as the flowers,” says Longfield-Gardens.com’s Langeveld.

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Jessica Dias
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