DoctorsHealthPress.com Reports on Study; Exercising in the Morning Could Curb Food Cravings

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The Doctors Health Press, a publisher of various natural health newsletters, books, and reports, including the popular online Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin, is reporting on new research showing that 45 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous exercise in the morning actually reduces the craving for food.

DoctorsHealthPress.com Reports on Study; Exercising in the Morning Could Curb Food Cravings

DoctorsHealthPress.com Reports on Study; Exercising in the Morning Could Curb Food Cravings

With respect to diet goals, the women who exercised ended up not eating more food that day to make up for the extra calories they burned off. In fact, they ate about the same number of calories as on an off-day.

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The Doctors Health Press, a publisher of various natural health newsletters, books, and reports, including the popular online Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin, is reporting on new research showing that 45 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous exercise in the morning actually reduces the craving for food.

As reported in Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin (http://www.doctorshealthpress.com/weight-loss-articles/want-to-eat-less-try-doing-this), we know that exercise helps burn energy, but now we know that it changes the way we view food in the hours afterward. To get an idea of this, researchers measured the food motivation of 18 normal-weight women and 17 obese women over two separate days.

The first day, each woman briskly walked on a treadmill for 45 minutes. Within the hour, their brain waves were measured while they looked at 240 images. Half the images were of plated food and half were of flowers. A week later, the same test was done at the same time in the morning, but without the exercise.

What happened? The 45-minute exercise bout not only produced lower brain responses to the food images, but also resulted in an increase in total physical activity that day—regardless of body mass index.

Doctors Health Press also reports that the researchers wanted to see if obesity made people crave food more. But it didn’t. Yet it was clear that the exercise bout was playing a role in their neural responses to the pictures of food.

With respect to diet goals, the women who exercised ended up not eating more food that day to make up for the extra calories they burned off. In fact, they ate about the same number of calories as on an off-day.

(SOURCE: Loureiro, M., et al., "The effects of nutritional labels on obesity," Agricultural Economics, 2012; 43: 333.)

Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin is a daily e-letter providing natural health news with a focus on natural healing through foods, herbs and other breakthrough health alternative treatments. For more information on Doctors Health Press, visit http://www.doctorshealthpress.com.

The Doctors Health Press believes in the healing properties of various alternative remedies, including Traditional Chinese Medicine. To see a video outlining the Doctors Health Press' views on Traditional Chinese Medicine, visit http://www.doctorshealthpress.com/chinesemedicine.

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