Turquoise Mining History Explored on New Website

Turquoise mining throughout the ages is the prime topic of a newly-launched informational website, according to HistoryofTurquoisemines.com.

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Wherever you find historical use of turquoise, you'll also notice a deep spiritual connection between the stone and the people

Scottsdale, AZ (PRWEB) September 27, 2012

Types of turquoise and the mines they come from are being explored in depth on a new website aimed at providing visitors with valuable information about the popular gemstone.

"Turquoise mining has been embraced by ancient civilizations since prehistoric times," said website author Stanley Danforth. "I wanted to focus on the history of turquoise mines to provide visitors will a new perspective and respect for the origins of this beautiful stone."

Visitors will learn about the history of turquoise mining in the Southwestern United States and all over the world.

There are sections that explore the early beginnings of Persian turquoise mining, which continues today.

"Wherever you find historical use of turquoise, you'll also notice a deep spiritual connection between the stone and the people," Danforth said. "The Persians believed having turquoise on the handle of a stone would make one a better warrior."

Turquoise mining also played a major role in the development and religious beliefs of Native American tribes of the Southwest.

"The Navajo people actually mined turquoise hundreds of years ago using hot coals and rudimentary tools," Danforth said. "Refrences to turquoise can be found in the Navajo creation story, which shows how important this stone was, and is, to the culture."

Enthusiasts and collectors will learn more about the types of turquoise available today as well as varieties that are no longer on the market, but remain highly sought after.

Turquoise mining continues today all over the world, but has a long and diverse tradition. Many mines have depleted their supply, but a few still produce enough of the stone to meet commercial demand.

"We'd encourage anyone to drop by and learn more about turquoise mining," Danforth said. "It really is a wonderful stone with a great history."

To learn more about turquoise mining throughout the world, visit historyofturquoisemines.com.


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