Do Statins Help Stop Thrombosis? Online Clinic Uk-Med.co.uk releases an article looking at the latest reports.

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Previous studies on how statins may help to prevent thrombosis dont stack, up according to a new report.

Almost seven million high cholesterol sufferers in the UK take statins, which prevent certain enzymes found in the liver from forming fats that can clog arteries

Dr Kazem Rahimi, a consultant cardiologist and senior clinical researcher with the Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, in the John Radcliffe hospital in Oxford led the team of researchers reviewing the data. They reviewed reports and some unpublished papers, which enlisted more than 100,000 patient volunteers. The comparison between those taking statins and the ones not taking the medication was that 0.9% receiving the medication and 1% of those not taking statins experienced venous thrombosis. This took into account people taking differing dosages of medication and showed that there was very little variation whether they took it or not.

In the previous Jupiter trial, the outcome of the results published in 2009 used Crestor (Rosuvastatin) made by AstraZeneca plc a British/Swedish pharmaceutical company. They claimed that is reduced the risk of blood clots by 50%, this was in healthy adults, so it was suggested that it should be used as a preventive.

The number of people on whon the original study was based (17,800 Volunteers) was quite low, so possibly a larger group should have been studied.

During the original tests carried out on these 17,800 volunteers, some were administered Crestor and others placebos. In the two year review it was found that 34 of the statin takers and sixty within the placebo group had gone on to form a blood clot.

Dr Rahimi could not find evidence of this occurring. As a director of the British Heart Foundation and an expert in cardiovascular medicine, Professor Peter Weissberg said that 'An earlier study suggested that one statin, Rosuvastatin, might reduce the risk of blood clots in deep veins and lungs, known as venous thromboembolism. However, findings in single studies can sometimes happen by chance. By pooling a large amount of data on several different types of statin, this analysis shows that any significant protection against blood clots is highly unlikely.'

Almost seven million high cholesterol sufferers in the UK take statins, which prevent certain enzymes found in the liver from forming fats that can clog arteries. This bad cholesterol causes a plaque to form in blood vessels and this can cause erectile dysfunction. As a good blood flow is a key to combatting ED, Viagra and Cialis are useful medications in helping with this problem as it relaxes the arteries.

A recent genetic link has been made between cancer and cholesterol by the New York, University of Rochester, by Dr Hucky Land, which means that a daily dose of statins could be a preventative against cancerous tumours developing. This medication could be as inexpensive as 40p a day to prescribe. Even though the newest review of statin benefit has been found in certain respects, not to be working as the study showed. With the long term use of statins proving that there are fewer strokes or heart attacks and adding cancer prevention to this equation, it can only be of good to the many millions of patients that take them on a regular basis.

Article Source: http://www.uk-med.co.uk/Health/Do-Statins-Help-Stop-Thrombosis

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