Farm Credit Mid-America Congratulates Tennessee Couple to Compete for National AFBF Honors

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David and Meghan Corvin's love for agriculture and sharing it with young people recently earned the couple their state’s Excellence in Agriculture award at the Tennessee Farm Bureau Convention.

With only two percent of people today involved in production agriculture, I believe it’s important to let young people know how agriculture and things like food safety and security directly impact their lives and their future livelihoods

David and Meghan Corvin of Dresden, Tenn. can’t remember a time when agriculture wasn’t a vital part of their lives.

“I love to be outdoors and be around farm animals, that’s what I’ve done my whole life,” said David. “That’s been Meghan’s experience too.”

That love for agriculture and sharing it with young people recently earned David and Meghan their state’s Excellence in Agriculture award at the Tennessee Farm Bureau Convention. The award recognizes successful individuals, 35 or younger, who are involved in production agriculture, but who don’t farm as their primary occupation.

Criteria for the award include farm involvement as well as participation in Farm Bureau and other community organizations. As state winners, the Corvins received a John Deere Gator, compliments of Farm Credit Mid-America, which also sponsored the Excellence in Agriculture program. After winning their state competition, the Corvins will now compete for national honors at the American Farm Bureau Federation’s annual convention, which starts January 13 in Nashville, Tenn.

David and Meghan met in college while studying agriculture at Virginia Tech. After graduation, they moved to Kansas, where David managed an Angus ranch. Then in 2005, the couple relocated to northwest Tennessee after Meghan was offered a position as head coach of the University of Tennessee-Martin’s NCAA equestrian team. David took a position as a technical service advisor for Tyson Foods, where he works directly with 23 farm families that annually grow 10 million broilers for McDonald’s.

The couple, who have a three-year-old daughter, Molly, also operates their own small, diversified farm, where they have a 25 cow, cow-calf herd consisting of Angus-Simmental genetics. They also recently tried their hand at raising pumpkins, which are then marketed through roadside stands and agritourism sites, with a portion of those proceeds going to support 4-H. Their initial experience with pumpkins was successful enough that they are planning to expand the enterprise.

David and Meghan are not only very involved in Farm Bureau, but a variety of community activities, many of them involving youth. Meghan conducts many riding camps and clinics and David speaks to more than five thousand young people each year, bringing them the positive message of today’s agriculture.

“With only two percent of people today involved in production agriculture, I believe it’s important to let young people know how agriculture and things like food safety and security directly impact their lives and their future livelihoods,” said David.

David is quick to give credit to organizations that have helped him and Meghan achieve their success.

“I can’t begin to put a price tag on the skills that Farm Bureau has helped us to develop,” he says. “And I really appreciate all the support that Farm Credit gives to the Tennessee Young Farmers and Ranchers Program.”

The Corvins have been Farm Credit members since coming to Tennessee and for the last five years David has been an advisory member for the financial services cooperative. Dresden Farm Credit financial services officer Jon Quinn shared some of his excitement at seeing two of his good young customers receive this recognition.

“David and Meghan are outstanding advocates for agriculture, and we need leaders today who aren’t afraid to take a stand and help to promote ag to others,” he said. “Farm Credit is very pleased to support and recognize the efforts and hard work of talented young farmers and ranchers.”

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Randy Barbee

Christal Glover
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