Punch Drunk Tired: the New Jersey Car Accident Lawyers at Console & Hollawell Warn Motorists of the Serious Risks of Drowsy Driving

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently shed light on a disturbing trend on America’s roads—drowsy driving. While many may not realize it, drivers get behind the wheel while tired all the time, and these sleepy can cause plenty of destruction.

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Accidents caused by drowsy drivers are 100 percent preventable, and accidents cause by this kind of behavior may end in legal responsibility for resulting damage.

Marlton, NJ (PRWEB) January 14, 2013

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently shed light on a disturbing trend on America’s roads—drowsy driving. While many may not realize it, drivers get behind the wheel while tired all the time, and these sleepy can cause plenty of destruction. The CDC report indicated that upwards of 5,000 fatal accidents a year may be contributed to drowsy drivers. The New Jersey accident lawyers at Console & Hollawell feel that the public needs to be more aware of this issue and realize that driving when tired could be putting motorists at risk.

“Obviously falling asleep while driving is an action many can agree is very dangerous, but most don’t realize that driving while tired can be just as, if not more, dangerous,” said Richard P. Console, Jr., managing partner at the firm.

Drowsiness can have many effects on a person’s central nervous system including decreased attentiveness, slower reaction time, and can increase the difficult for a driver to make a decision. The real shock is that those who choose to drive when fatigued are akin to those who drive after consuming alcohol. The CDC explained that after being awake for 18 consecutive hours, the impairment of the driver is that of someone with a .05 blood alcohol content (BAC), and after 24 hours without sleep the impairment would be that of a .10 BAC—above the legal limit for alcohol consumption.

“A driver who chooses to get behind the wheel when their cognitive abilities are compromised by inadequate sleep is being nearly as negligent as a drunk driver, as the CDC data shows,” Console said. “Accidents caused by drowsy drivers are 100 percent preventable, and accidents cause by this kind of behavior may end in legal responsibility for resulting damage.”

The best way to avoid these tragic instances of decreased mental capacity is to get enough sleep every night. The National Institutes of Health recommends that adults need between seven and eight hours of sleep each night. In addition to getting enough rest, individuals who are tired should avoid consuming alcohol, even in legally acceptable quantities, as the CDC stated that lower levels of alcohol consumption when paired with tiredness amplify the effects of the beverages.

The lawyers at Console & Hollawell have been protecting the rights of accident victims, including those injured by drowsy drivers, since 1994. If you have been injured by a tired driver, contact an attorney to discuss your rights to compensation.

http://www.cdc.gov/Features/dsDrowsyDriving/index.html

http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/sdd/howmuch.html