Carl Jung and Africa: The Asheville Jung Center Plans Expert Discussion on the Impact Jung’s Travels to Africa Had on His Life in Upcoming Seminar

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Out of Africa there is always something new. The Asheville Jung Center will explore how Africa stirred Carl Jung and still calls to us today on February 7th, 2013.

Tree at Sundown
This seminar will focus on the contributions of anthropology to analytical psychology and Jungian psychoanalysis.

The significance for Jung of his travels in Africa is strongly expressed in his autobiographical work, Memories, Dreams, Reflections. The significance for Jung of his travels in Africa is strongly expressed in his autobiographical work, Memories, Dreams, Reflections. So great was the impact of Africa on Jung that he claimed: “There the cosmic meaning of consciousness became overwhelmingly clear to me. ‘What nature leaves imperfect, the art perfects,’ say the alchemists. Man, I, in an invisible act of creation put the stamp of perfection on the world by giving it objective existence.” (MDR, pp. 255-6). This realization came to him as he observed the African landscape. On February 7th at 11:00 AM EST the Asheville Jung Center will host a global seminar on Jung’s experiences in Africa. The seminar will feature Dr. Murray Stein and Dr. Peter Ammann presenting live from Zurich at the International School of Analytical Psychology Zurich. The Asheville Jung Center is hosting the live seminar online. The Asheville Jung Center was founded in 2008 to advance the psychology of Carl Jung and promote an international Jungian community. It is affiliated with innerQuest Psychiatry and Counseling, a regional psychiatrist group.

Peter Ammann’s fascination with Africa is also by now long-standing and to many who have heard him lecture and have watched his films utterly convincing. A student of Jung’s several journeys to Africa, Peter Ammann has taken further steps to extend the studies of native African thinking and practices of healing begun some 85 years ago by Jung himself. In this seminar, he will tell the story of how he came to be so smitten with Africa and its people, in particular with its native healers, but also with its ancient traditions of art. In this he follows upon the stories of African Bushmen as recounted by Sir Laurens van der Post in his well-known books such as The Lost World of the Kalahari and The Heart of the Hunter. He will also follow the lead of Jungian analyst, Dr. Vera Buhrmann who lived her entire life in South Africa and contributed to our knowledge of native healers in her work Living in Two Worlds. Peter Ammann’s conclusion after studying with several native African healers and filming their ceremonies is that modern psychology would do well to learn from them. In this seminar he will present the results of his research.

This seminar will focus on the contributions of anthropology to analytical psychology and Jungian psychoanalysis. Throughout his mature years, Jung looked to anthropological studies from near and far to place a wider frame on his work with patients and especially with dreams and unconscious factors. Many Jungian psychoanalysts have followed him along these lines of research, notably such figures as Joseph Henderson, Donald Sandner, Vera Buhrmann and most recently Jerome Bernstein. Especially important is the open attitude of Jungian psychology toward learning about psychic healing from a wide variety of human sources, including practitioners in shamanistic traditions.

Don’t miss this extraordinary experience. Internet slots are limited. Register today to reserve your seat.

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Ryan Deegan
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