The Heart Institute at Staten Island University Hospital Offers a New Procedure to Eliminate a Major Cause of Sudden Cardiac Death

The Heart Institute at Staten Island University Hospital is the first hospital in Staten Island, Brooklyn & Queens to perform this innovative procedure.

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Dr. Marcin Kowalski, In hybrid EP Lab at The Heart Institute at Staten Island University Hospital

Until recently, Staten Islanders at high risk of developing VF that couldn’t tolerate beta blockers or ACE inhibitors, had no surgical option here on the island. Now thanks to Dr. Kowalski this surgery is available at The Heart Institute

Staten Island, New York (PRWEB) January 23, 2013

Throughout 2012, The Heart Institute became one of a select group of hospitals in the New York Metropolitan area to treat patients utilizing Epicardial and Endocardial Ablations. This breakthrough treatment cures Ventricular Tachycardia (VT) a lifelong ailment that affects people in a wide variety of ways, including fainting, fatigue, syncope and in more serious cases sudden cardiac death. If VT is left untreated, a high percentage of cases VT can turn into a more lethal cardiac rhythm called Ventricular Fibrillation (VF) and ultimately present as cardiac arrests. While typical treatments for VT call for a lifetime of medications patients who undergo the ablation can begin to reduce their risk of more developing more serious heart rhythms while also avoiding the risks associated with a lifetime of treatment by prescription medications. The ablation techniques were performed at The Heart Institute by clinical cardiac electrophysiologist, Dr. Marcin Kowalski. The procedure uses a new mapping tool called a PentaRay High-Density Mapping Catheter, developed by Biosense Webster. The PentaRay Catheter helps to map complex arrhythmias in any chamber of the heart. This procedure begins by entering through the safest and most direct entry point to the heart, just under the breast bone at the bottom of the rib cage. Using a special needle to make entry into the pericardial space, a wire is inserted and then a plastic tube is inserted over the wire and then the needle is removed. This plastic tube allows the catheters to enter and identify the affected area of the heart. The affected area within the heart can actually be identified from outside the heart wall due to the accuracy of the PentaRay Catheter. Once the area is identified the affected zone is ablated. Dr. Kowalski performed ten ablation procedures all without complications. “Until recently, Staten Islanders at high risk of developing VF that couldn’t tolerate beta blockers or ACE inhibitors, had no surgical option here on the island. Now thanks to Dr. Kowalski this surgery is available at The Heart Institute,” said Dr. Joseph T. McGinn, Chairman, Director of Surgery Staten Island University Hospital. For more information please contact Richard A. Clarke, at 917-868-1407, or by email: RClarke(at)TheHeartInstituteNY(dot)com.
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About The Heart Institute
The Heart Institute opened in 2001 and is operated at the North Campus of Staten Island University Hospital at 475 Seaview Avenue. It is one of the nation’s leading heart hospitals, known for its pioneering techniques in heart surgery (MICS), angioplasties and electrophysiology (Afib), for its most advanced diagnostic technologies, post-surgical outpatient care, and cardiac prevention programs. Procedures include coronary bypass operations, heart valve repair/replacements, angioplasties, cardiac ablations and cardiac catheterizations.

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Dr. Joseph T. McGinn holding a Medtronic device called the "Starfish" Dr. Joseph T. McGinn holding a Medtronic device called the "Starfish"

Dr. Joseph T. McGinn with the "Starfish" device he helped design for performing MICS CABG