Cruise Ship Makes First Amver Rescue of 2013

The cruise ship Orion made the first Amver rescue of 2013 when the crew rescued a 56 year old solo sailor from a life raft off the coast of Tasmania.

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The crew of the cruise ship Orion assists a 56 year old French sailor after he was rescued from his liferaft off the coast of Tasmania. Photo credit: Facebok

"His hands are a little swollen and some joints are a little stiff but he is walking around his suite," expedition leaders Don and Margie McIntyre said.

New York, NY (PRWEB) January 25, 2013

The cruise ship Orion made the first Amver rescue of 2013 in a treacherous rescue off the coast of Tasmania. According to the Australian Maritime Safety Authority, a solo sailor spent 56 hours in a life raft in the Southern Ocean after his yacht was de-masted and hull damaged in rough weather on Friday, January 18, 2013 during a round the world journey.

Amver, sponsored by the United States Coast Guard, is a unique, computer-based, and voluntary global ship reporting system used worldwide by search and rescue authorities to arrange for assistance to persons in distress at sea.

Australian rescue personnel sent search aircraft that dropped survival and communications equipment to the sailor and contacted the master of the Orion. The cruise ship was 600 miles away from the sailor when rescue authorities requested the captain divert the 337 foot ship and provide assistance. Once the Orion reached the life raft the recovery of the sailor took approximately one hour. The crew of the Bahamian flagged cruise ship were assisted by better than expected weather conditions.

The sailor was in good health with only minor injuries and was taken back to Hobart, Tasmania. "His hands are a little swollen and some joints are a little stiff but he is walking around his suite," expedition leaders Don and Margie McIntyre said, "he ordered a steak for lunch!"

The Orion, managed by Orion Expedition Cruises of North Sydney, Australia, enrolled in the Amver system on March 31, 2005 and has earned 3 Amver awards for participation.

With Amver, rescue coordinators can identify participating ships in the area of distress and divert the best sited ship or ships to respond. Vessels send periodic position reports to the Amver center until arriving at their port of call. This data is able to project the position of each ship at any point during its voyage. In an emergency, any rescue coordination center can request this data to determine the relative position of Amver ships near the distress location. On any day there are over 5,000 ships available to carry out search and rescue services. Visit http://www.amver.com to learn more about this unique worldwide search and rescue system


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