American Rigger’s Supply Trainers Become Authorized to Use Crosby Training Materials for "Fundamentals of Rigging"

Share Article

American Rigger’s Supply and The Crosby Group are long time partners in bringing critical information to the end user in terms of managing risk when lifting and moving loads. By working closely together as manufacturer and distributor, educating those using rigging equipment, they bring added value to the marketplace, both the law and industry standards require training.

American Rigger’s Supply and The Crosby Group are long time partners in bringing critical information to the end user in terms of managing risk when lifting and moving loads. By working closely together as manufacturer and distributor, educating those using rigging equipment, they bring added value to the marketplace, both the law and industry standards require training.

THE LAW

Since enactment of the Occupational Safety and Health Act in 1971, and the birth of OSHA, industry has struggled with understanding the law and staying compliant with its requirements. A seemingly simple question such as “Am I required to use a hook latch in our application?” can be difficult to answer. Receiving training and being knowledgeable regarding the law and its application are invaluable.

OSHA 1926.21 (b)(2):

  •     “The employer shall instruct each employee in the recognition and avoidance of unsafe         conditions and the regulations applicable to his work environment to control or eliminate any hazards or other exposure to illness or injury.

INDUSTRY STANDARDS:

The American Society of Mechanical Engineers B30 series of safety standards apply to Cableways, Cranes, Derricks, Hoists, Hooks, Jacks and slings. These are consensus industry standards and are voluntary in terms of the law. However, if the choice is made to ignore A.S.M.E. recommendations and requirements, additional risk is created for employees and their employers as well. Often times OSHA will refer to A.S.M.E. standards when evaluating working conditions in terms of safety. After a worker is injured on the job is a regretful time for the question to come up regarding why there was a lack of compliance.

A.S.M.E. B30.9

  •     “…sling users shall be trained in the selection, inspection, cautions to personnel, effects of the environment, and rigging practices…”

A.S.M.E. B30.26

  •     Rigging hardware “users shall be trained in the selection, inspection, cautions to personnel, effects of environment and rigging practices”.

The Fundamental and Basic Rigging classes offered by The Crosby Group and American Rigger’s Supply address OSHA and ASME requirements.

Typical course topics –

    RISK MANAGEMENT

1.    The Working Load Limit

2.    Evaluating The Rigging

3.    The Basic Rigging Plan

    RIGGING PRINCIPLES AND LOAD CONTROL

1.    Sling Operating Practices per B30.9

2.    Load Control Basics

    LOADS ON RIGGING AND THE RIGGING TRIANGLE

1.    Determining Weight of Load

2.    Finding the COG

3.    The Rigging Triangle

4.    The Load Multiplier and L/H

5.    Determining Tension in Sling Legs

    APPLICATION OF HARDWARE

1.    Hoist Hooks and latches
2.    Proper Application of Shackles
3.    Links and Rings
4.    Eye Bolts, Hoist Rings, Sorting Hooks
5.    New Expectations for Rigging Hardware B30.26

    INSPECTION OF RIGGING HARDWARE
    INSPECTION OF SLINGS

1.    Wire Rope Slings
2.    Chain Slings
3.    Synthetic Slings
4.    Wire Mesh slings

    APPLICATION OF SLINGS

1.    Wire Rope Slings
2.    Chain Slings
3.    Synthetic Slings
4.    Wire Mesh Slings

Training for employees involved in lifting and moving loads is required by the law and by industry standards. Proper rigging training is a proven method of reducing risk in the workplace. The Crosby Group and American Rigger’s Supply offer this value added training to the end user and work with industry towards a safer work environment.

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Visit website