How to Wrestle a 30-Day Money Inadequacy - an Article Published by FinancesOnline.com

An article published by FinancesOnline.com that offers practical ways to manage a situation when one is forced to cut back at least for a month, either to buy some time looking to augment earnings or to make a firm decision on what budget items must go permanently to lessen expenditures.

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What are the things that should be in the bills payment priority? What expense items can be put on hold as put-off payables?

New York City, New York (PRWEB) January 31, 2013

Lesser take-home pay and the difficulty in securing a permanent job have begun to take its toll upon many American households, many of whom are unprepared in the frenzy of heated debates that took place in the tail-end of 2012. It is now highly probable to find one’s self down to the last $300, while the next 30 days loom with queue of bills and purchases to make. What to do?

How to Stretch your $300 to Last 30 Days by FinancesOnline.com is a timely article that emphasizes the need to take a more serious approach to managing personal finance, and how budgeting skills have becomes more urgent now than ever before. It presents readers with a very real situation of hitting financial rock-bottom. That is, having only $300 for the next 30 days, until the new paycheck comes in. Going the way of frugality cannot be ignored.

Rob Carrick, personal finance columnist for The Globe and Mail for 14 years, distinguished between two kinds of frugality. "The first is active, where you control spending by choice to save more and stay out of debt. The second is reactive, where debt or other circumstances force you to cut back," he explained.

Cutting back is easier said than done. How to Stretch Your $300 to Last 30 Days by Financesonline.com offers practical ways to manage a situation when one is forced to cut back at least for a month, either to buy some time looking to augment earnings or to make a firm decision on what budget items must go permanently to lessen expenditures.

What are the things that should be in the bills payment priority? What expense items can be put on hold as put-off payables? With wisdom from a variety of financial rebound success stories coupled with cost-of-living information from official references, How to Stretch Your $300 to Last 30 Days by Financesonline.com shows readers not only how to hurdle this real financial challenge, but also why – the sensible reasons behind the decisions suggested.

Indeed, these are hard times. Taxes are increasing at a time when hiring is limited and salaries are barely growing.

Latest data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics showed that unemployment situation is not sliding down at 7.8% or 12.2 million in December 2012, the same level in September 2012. Likewise, the number of long-term unemployed or those who are jobless for 27 weeks or more did not decrease at 4.8 million and this group represented 39.1 percent of the total unemployed Americans. Likewise, part-time workers affected by economic problems reached 7.9 million in the same period. The Labor Department classified this group as Americans who were forced to work part-time because their work hours had been reduced or they cannot find a full-time job.

Adding to the bleakness of shaky employment is the latest report by The Conference Board which showed that US consumer confidence, already on a decline in the past months, plummeted by 8.1 points to 58.6, the lowest level in 14 months. The US Index of Consumer Confidence is conducted for The Conference Board by Nielsen, a leading global provider of information and analytics around what consumers buy and watch.

Lynn Franco, Director of Economic Indicators at The Conference Board said that the sharp decline erased all of the gains made through 2012. "Consumers are more pessimistic about the economic outlook and, in particular, their financial situation. The increase in the payroll tax has undoubtedly dampened consumers’ spirits and it may take awhile for confidence to rebound and consumers to recover from their initial paycheck shock,” she explained.

While today’s economic scenario may be depressing to American households, hitting rock bottom financially may not be a new experience for some people, and even rich and successful people have been there at some point in their lives. The secret to gracefully rebound from zero balance pit is sensible and skillful prioritizing. How to Stretch your $300 to Last 30 Days by Financesonline.com brings the good news that yes, one can successfully manage with as little as $300 for 30 long days, and make a total rebound after surviving the trying times.

Discover how you can win over real financial challenges with How to Stretch your $300 to Last 30 Days by Financesonline.com and never look at $300 the same way again.


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