CIR Announces Upcoming Report, "Next-Generation Ethernet: From 100 Gbps to 400 Gbps and Beyond" Due in November 2013

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CIR presents our view on how 400 GigE will be commercialized, how the 400 GigE business case will be made, and where the opportunities are to be found for carriers, equipment makers and component makers.

Industry analyst firm CIR today announced the addition of a new report to its schedule titled, "Next-Generation Ethernet: From 100 Gbps to 400 Gbps and Beyond" that will be issued in November 2013. CIR presents in this report our view on how 400 GigE will be commercialized, how the 400 GigE business case will be made, and where the opportunities are to be found for carriers, equipment makers and component makers.

About the Report:

With 40 GigE commonplace and 100 GigE no longer bleeding edge, optical networking is ready to embark on a quest for 400 GigE; perhaps an interim step on the way to Terabit Ethernet.

CIR has been tracking the commercial development of Ethernet since 1991, when the now-ubiquitous GigE technology was the avant-garde. We have subsequently analyzed every generation of Ethernet all the way to 100 Gbps. So we understand user needs, technology requirements and deployment patterns. And we are especially adept at identifying the commercial opportunities flowing from the latest developments in optical Ethernet.

Based on this more than two decades, CIR presents in this report our view on how 400 GigE will be commercialized, how the 400 GigE business case will be made, and where the opportunities are to be found for carriers, equipment makers and component makers.

This report will make compelling reading for optical networking firms at the equipment, subsystem and component levels of the Ethernet value chain. The report contains a quantitative forecast over the next decade for 400 GigE under several different scenarios, along with an assessment of strategies of the firms that CIR believes will be the key players in this space.

Coverage Points:

Executive Summary

  •     The business case for 400 GigE
  •     400 GigE as enabling technology: End User Opportunities
  •     Data centers and LANs
  •     Carrier networks
  •     Eight firms to watch in the 400 GigE space
  •     When will equipment manufacturers deploy 400 GigE ports?
  •     Optical component and subsystem opportunities from 400 GigE
  •     Onwards to Terabit Ethernet

Evolution of 400 GigE Technology

  •     Lessons learned from the 100 Gbps struggle
  •     Coordinating groups, standards and MSAs
  •     IEEE 400 Gigabit Ethernet Study Group
  •     CDFP hot-pluggable MSA
  •     Optical Internetworking Forum (OIF)
  •     Impact of 400 GigE on the development of other networking standards
  •     Interfaces and transceivers
  •     16 x 25 Gbps or 50 Gbps?
  •     Optical interface issues
  •     Power consumption
  •     Connectors and cable
  •     How far on copper?
  •     Support on MMF and SMF
  •     Parallel single-mode fiber
  •     Possible signaling schemes
  •     Possible use of novel modulation schemes
  •     Use of forward error correction

Drivers and Retarding Factors for 400 GigE Demand

  •     Positive impact of current data trends on the need for next-generation Ethernet
  •     “Big data”
  •     Cloud computing
  •     Video streaming
  •     Impact of content delivery networks (CDNs) and “content farms”
  •     Network architecture factors driving the need for 400 GigE
  •     Factors retarding the need for 400 GigE networks

Potential Markets for 400 GigE

  •     400 GigE in the data center
  •     Growth in data center size, processing power and storage capacity
  •     400 GigE in future LAN switches
  •     400 Gbps in the metro network
  •     400 GigE for metro aggregation
  •     400 GigE in the core network
  •     400 GigE in WAN switches and routers
  •     OTN, mesh networks and 400 GigE
  •     Key points from this chapter

Business Cases and Scenarios for 400 GigE

  •     Economics of 400 GigE
  •     Cost objectives for 400 GigE
  •     Component costs
  •     Time frames for development and deployment of 400 GigE
  •     First generation: 16 x 25
  •     Second generation: 8 x 50
  •     Third generation: 4 x 100 Gbps
  •     Possible ten-year scenarios and forecasts for revenue generation from 400 GigE
  •     Timeframe for Terabit Ethernet
  •     Key points from this chapter

About CIR:

Communications Industry Researchers has been publishing hype-free industry analysis of the high-speed optical networking market for more than 20 years. It has recently published reports on rack-level and board-to-board optical interconnection and on active optical cabling. Visit http://www.cir-inc.com for a full listing of CIR’s reports and other services.

Contact:

Robert Nolan
ilumatech
rob(at)ilumatech(dot)com
(804) 938-0030

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Robert Nolan
CIR
(804) 938-0030
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