Red Flags for Primary Teachers, Katie Johnson's Book about Children's Vision, Wins in The Great Midwest Book Festival Contest

Red Flags for Primary Teachers, written by Katie Johnson after many years of teaching first grade in regular education classrooms, has won an honorable mention in The Great Midwest Book Festival. It was competing in a class of new non-fiction titles.

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There are about 25-30% of children in our primary schools today who have some problem with their vision.

Seattle, WA (PRWEB) November 09, 2013

Katie Johnson's latest book about young children, Red Flags for Primary Teachers: 27 Neurodevelopmental and Vision Issues that Affect Learning With Activities to Help, has received an Honorable Mention award in the 2013 Great Midwest Book Festival contest. Contest organizers congratulate all who placed "in a very tough competition."

Red Flags tells stories of ordinary children in ordinary classrooms who are puzzling to their teachers because there is no obvious reason why they are having trouble with reading. After forty years of working in first grades all over the country, teaching children how to read and write, she has seen many puzzling children. Why can’t some of them read?

Katie believes that many children are having trouble learning to read and liking to read because they have problems with their vision – not their eyesight – or problems with their neurological development.

Red Flags for Primary Teachers presents such children, all students Katie has worked with during her teaching career in Maine and in Shoreline, WA. The book is organized into three parts: What I See, What I Do, and What I Have Learned. Each child is presented in a story, a short vignette of classroom life, described in an informal retelling of what the child does that Katie notices and is concerned about - that is, a red flag.

There are about 25-30% of children in our primary schools today who have some problem with their vision. "We need to work on this," Katie Johnson says. "It is really a national disgrace."

Each child in the book presents a different problem, either a problem of vision or a problem of developmental patterning: tracking; double vision; skipping lines in a book; writing in a triangle down the side of a page. In the "What I Do" section, Katie gives directions for activities that might help resolve or ay least improve this problem.

"I hope this contest success will highlight the issues raised in the book," Johnson says. "It is a great pleasure to me."

The winners have been posted on the Great Midwest Book Festival web site. http://www.greatmidwestbookfestival.com.


Contact

  • Katie Johnson
    KatieJohnsonAuthor.com
    206-548-0155
    Email