Weight-loss Surgery Offers Short and Long-Term Benefits for Obese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes, According to New Study Co-Authored by SAGES Members

Nine years after weight-loss surgery, obese patients with Type 2 Diabetes continue to improve or reverse their diabetes and reduce cardiovascular risk factors.

  • Share on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Share on LinkedInEmail a friendRepost This
'The majority of obese patients with type 2 diabetes who undergo bariatric surgery have substantial improvement in the ability to control their blood sugars with reduced medication requirements,' said Dr. Kevin Reavis.

(PRWEB) November 14, 2013

As part of American Diabetes Month, the Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons believes patients should know that weight-loss surgery, or bariatric surgery, offers short and long-term benefits for obese patients with type 2 diabetes.

According to new research from Cleveland Clinic's Bariatric & Metabolic Institute, patients will continue to improve or reverse their diabetes, and reduce their cardiovascular risk factors, nine years after the procedure. (1) Key predictors of sustained diabetes remission are long-term weight loss, a shorter duration of diabetes prior to surgery (less than five years), and undergoing gastric bypass surgery compared to adjustable gastric banding. Among the study’s authors are SAGES members Dr. Ali Aminian, Dr. Stacey Brethauer, Dr. Bipan Chand, Dr. Matthew Kroh and Dr. Philip R. Schauer.

“The majority of obese patients with type 2 diabetes who undergo bariatric surgery have substantial improvement in the ability to control their blood sugars with reduced medication requirements,” said Dr. Kevin Reavis of the Oregon Clinic Division of Gastrointestinal and Minimally Invasive Surgery who co-chairs SAGES Bariatric Liaison Group. “In fact, many patients undergo remission of their diabetes in which case they no longer require medication to control their blood sugars,” Dr. Reavis added.

Morbidly obese patients with type 2 diabetes should ask their prescribing physician to consider referral for bariatric surgery to address their weight and diabetes issues. Patients considering weight-loss surgery are encouraged to read Laparoscopic Surgery for Severe (Morbid) Obesity Patient Information from SAGES at http://www.sages.org/publications/patient-information/.

About SAGES
SAGES, The Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons, was founded over 30 years ago with the mission improving quality patient care through education, research, innovation and leadership, principally in gastrointestinal and endoscopic surgery. SAGES is a leading surgical society, representing a worldwide community of over 6,000 surgeons that can bring minimal access surgery, endoscopy and emerging techniques to patients worldwide. SAGES has been at the forefront of best practices in laparoscopic surgery by researching, developing and disseminating the guidelines and training for standards of practice in surgical procedures.

(1) Can Diabetes Be Surgically Cured? Long-Term Metabolic Effects of Bariatric Surgery in Obese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Annals of Surgery: October 2013 - Volume 258 - Issue 4 - p 628–637.


Contact

Follow us on: Contact's Facebook Contact's Twitter